Los Angeles Online Film Critics Society awards winners

It’s only been a few days since the members of the Los Angeles Online Film Critics Society released the nominees for their annual awards, and the winners have already been determined. However, don’t expect this to be an indication of how any of the major awards are going to go down later this season. Our editor-in-chief Peter Sciretta is counted among this group, and the wide array of film critics from various backgrounds makes the results skew much further from the norm than you might expect at the Golden Globes or Oscars.

However, that actually makes the Los Angeles Online Film Critics Society awards winners a little more interesting than the usual awards fare – they have awarded the adaptation of The Hate U Give Best Picture. How did the rest of the awards shake out ? Check out the full list below. Read More »

AFI awards 2018

The American Film Institute, the film school and film history organization famous for alumni like Darren Aronofsky, Patty Jenkins, Terrence Malick, and David Lynch, has announced the honorees of this year’s AFI Awards. The organization voted on ten movies and ten television series that are “artistically significant” and represent “the year’s most outstanding achievements in the art of the moving image”, and the winners include movies like If Beale Street Could Talk, BlacKkKlansman, Eighth Grade, and shows like Atlanta and Barry. But they also honored a couple of surprises in each category, too. Read More »

Gotham Awards 2018

The 28th annual Gotham Awards took place last night, offering our first glimpse at a major awards show as we barrel toward the next Academy Awards ceremony. The Gotham Awards focus on independent movies, but plenty of previous winners have gone on to take home Oscar gold (Get Out and Call Me By Your Name were big winners last year).

This year, Chloe Zhao’s western drama The Rider took home the Best Feature prize in a highly competitive category, and Toni Collette and Ethan Hawke won in the lead acting categories for their stunning work in Hereditary and First Reformed, respectively. Eighth Grade also won big, earning trophies for actress Elsie Fisher and director Bo Burnham. Read the full list of winners below. Read More »

We the Animals - 2019 Independent Spirit Awards Nominations

Awards season is officially in full swing as the folks at Film Independent have officially announced the nominations for the 2019 Independent Spirit Awards, honoring achievements in independent film for the year 2018.

Jeremiah Zagar‘s film We the Animals led the indie pack with five total nominations. But coming in close behind are two wildly different A24 films, Bo Burnham‘s coming of age comedy Eighth Grade and Paul Schrader‘s challenging drama First Reformed, each with four nominations. Other films landing nods include You Were Never Really Here, Hereditary, The Tale and more

Get the full list of the 2019 Independent Spirit Award nominations below. Read More »

Eighth Grade screening

A24 is making school cool again. The indie studio is holding special free screenings for Bo Burnham‘s acclaimed coming-of-age flick Eighth Grade at 100 middle schools across the country this fall. Now this is the kind of school outreach I could get behind.

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Summer Movie Awards

Film festival season is officially underway, and while movies that emerge from fests like Venice, Toronto, and Telluride often become Oscar contenders, the Los Angeles Online Film Critics Society isn’t ready to look that far ahead just yet. Instead, they’ve looked back at the films of the past few months and issued their Summer Movie Awards, with Mission: Impossible – Fallout and performers like John Cho (Searching), Toni Collette (Hereditary), and Constance Wu (Crazy Rich Asians) winning big.

Take a look at the full list of winners below.
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Academy Conversations

Blockbuster summer is almost over, and while you might have seen a lot of big studio movies in theaters over the past few months, hopefully you also caught some of the indie gems that hit the big screen in between all the explosions, superheroes and general noise of tentpole releases.

For those of you lucky enough to catch lower profile releases like Blindspotting, Eighth Grade, Sorry to Bother You, Puzzle, The Miseducation of Cameron Post and Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot, now you can watch a batch of Q&A videos from special screenings at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences featuring the filmmakers and casts of these acclaimed indie movies. Read More »

Jaws

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, find out how realistic the shark attacks we’ve seen in movies like Jaws over the years actually are. Plus, check out one of the most extensive lists of Ready Player One Easter eggs now that the movie is out on home video, and check out a discussion with Eighth Grade director Bo Burnham and young star Elsie Fisher. Read More »

eighth grade free screenings

Despite its title, eighth graders probably won’t be able to see Eighth Grade in theaters. Bo Burnham‘s incisive, incredible film about coming of age in the digital age was saddled with an R-rating thanks to a few errant curse words that the MPAA is unreasonably strict about. But it’s a film that eighth graders should see. And A24 agrees. This week, the studio will be hosting free screenings across the country that won’t enforce the movie’s R-rating to encourage all ages to see this pivotal and powerful movie.

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Eighth Grade Review

If you’re familiar with the stand-up comedy of Bo Burnham, you might not peg him to be the first candidate to write an emotion-driven comedy about a socially awkward eighth-grade girl who is trying to find her place in a world that she feels has no interest in getting to know her. But ever since its premiere at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival, Burnham’s Eighth Grade has been one of the most eagerly anticipated and critically acclaimed independent movies of the year, making its way through the festival circuit and now finally opening to wider audience beginning this weekend (the film is currently in very limited release in New York and Los Angeles).

Eighth Grade doesn’t adhere to a conventional, plot-driven structure, instead allowing Burnham and acting newcomer Elsie Fisher to piece together a compelling and inspirational character study of young Kayla, who lives with her well-meaning, single father (Josh Hamilton) and makes what she probably believes are inspirational YouTube videos about being yourself and having confidence—neither of which Kayla feels comfortable doing. But it becomes clear that these videos are more about boosting her own sense of worth in the world. Burnham places Kayla in a series of scarily authentic and believable situations, some of which make her wildly uncomfortable, while others give her (and the audience) hope that she’s on the verge of breaking out of her shell and becoming the young woman she imagines she is once she hits high school. It’s a film that walks the line between tragedy and comedy with such grace that you might think a more seasoned filmmaker had pulled it off.

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