Brie Larson on Hot Ones

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch a video essay exploring the visual style of director Christopher Nolan and how IMAX has only bolstered his work. Plus, Brie Larson takes some time to get spicy from home on a recent virtual edition of Hot Ones, and check out a visual effects breakdown of robots, environments, and more from the third season of Westworld. Read More »

War is hell but it sometimes provides the backdrop for great movies. The recent Blu-ray release of 1917, followed by the 50th anniversary, this week, of the Oscar-winning Patton, starring George C. Scott, is as good an excuse as any for cinephiles to hunker down in the trenches of an impromptu war movie marathon (especially if you’re stuck at home right now due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic).

With that in mind, here’s a mission for you, soldier: work your way through this chronological list of the best war movies of the last fifty years. “Best” is ultra-subjective, of course, but when you’re Alamo-ed up in a fort of pillows in your living room and there’s nothing good on television, few of these movies should disappoint.

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Oscars season is a time of the movie-going year unlike any other, seemingly mandating that film aficionados draw imaginary lines in the sand pitting certain works, both past and present, against each other in an occasionally insightful – though oftentimes frustrating – spectacle. Do you think Taika Waititi’s Best Picture nominee Jojo Rabbit goes so far as to make a mockery of sensitive (and unfortunately timely) issues while Terrence Malick’s much less mainstream A Hidden Life deserved the latter’s accolades? There’s likely a viral-ready tweet for that. Itching to examine all the ways that Todd Phillips’ Joker exposes both the strengths and weaknesses of the class commentary in Bong Joon-Ho’s Parasite? That’s already been fodder for some interesting reviews.

With 1917, directed by Sam Mendes, comparisons to another recent film from a similarly accomplished and distinctive filmmaker came flooding in even as early as its very first trailer, having only increased in fervor since its release. That movie, of course, is Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk, a fairly obvious parallel that strengthens its own case when considering how much Mendes himself has encouraged those correlations through his last several films.

What most sets Dunkirk and 1917 apart from other would-be pairings, however, is in how their inextricably linked subject matter goes far beyond mere surface-level similarities or reductive hot takes. Even with such notable differences in nuts-and-bolts filmmaking (perhaps exact opposites, in fact) and the depiction of two vastly disparate World Wars, both narratives feature purposefully grounded perspectives that are wielded to powerful effect. Despite being billed as ostensible war epics, both commit to premises based on preventing further bloodshed. And most intriguingly, Mendes and Nolan take pains to zero in on a particularly overlooked brand of heroism – the subtle, anonymous, understated kind that can add up to make the biggest difference.

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tarantino dunkirk

The denizens of Film Twitter aren’t the only folks out there ranking their best movies of the last decade. Quentin Tarantino decided to get in on the action as well, stopping by The Ringer’s Rewatchables podcast to sing the praises of Christopher Nolan‘s Dunkirk. Tarantino says that Nolan’s World War II epic is his number two movie of the decade – a revelation that seems to even surprise Tarantino himself.

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Julia Louis-Dreyfus Accepts the Mark Twain Prize

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, Julia Louis-Dreyfus accepts the prestigious 2018 Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. Plus, take a look back at some of the original cinematic universes that came together before the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and listen as Claire Foy takes a look back at the memorable characters she’s played in her career so far. Read More »

10 Things I Hate About You - Romantic Comedy Statistics

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, a video essay examines the evolution of romcoms over the years, including statistics of tropes spread across 79 of them. Plus, Oscar-winning editor Lee Smith talks about working on Dunkirk and see how Pixar’s Ratatouille changed from the script to the final version we saw in theaters. Read More »

Oscars 2018 Honest Trailer

This weekend brings the 90th Academy Awards to ABC to honor achievements in filmmaking from the previous year. The awards ceremony will broadcast live on Sunday, March 4 at 8pm ET/5pm PT with Hollywood’s finest glad-handing each other and kissing all the asses. Therefore it only makes sense that the Best Picture nominees get knocked down a few pegs beforehand.

The Oscars 2018 Honest Trailer lines up all nine of the movies up for this year’s top prize in film and fires off some quick jabs at them. It’s not quite as satisfying as the usual Honest Trailer (surely those will come later as they get released on home video), but it’s a good place to start for the time being. Read More »

Get Out Video Essay

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch a video essay exploring how Get Out does for horror what some of the most innovative films in the genre have done. Plus, check out the full rountable discussion between the buzzed about cinematographers from this awards season, and watch a trailer mash-up of Blades of Glory and I, Tonya. Read More »

2018 DGA Nominees DIscussion

The Director’s Guild Of America awards have already been handed out, giving Guillermo del Toro one of several major victories on his path to potentially (and seemingly likely) winning Best Director at the Academy Awards. But before the awards took place, all of the DGA nominees got together for an extensive conversation about their filmmaking process and more.

At the Director’s Guild of America’s Los Angeles Theater on February 3, 2018, Guillermo del Toro (The Shape of Water), Greta Gerwig (Lady Bird), Martin McDonagh (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri), Christopher Nolan (Dunkirk), and Jordan Peele (Get Out) all sat down for a three-hour conversation for the annual Meet the Nominees symposium.

Watch the 2018 DGA nominees discussion below. Read More »

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ADG and ACE Awards

As we lurch into the final weeks before the Oscars, a few more awards groups have given out their top prizes. Ceremonies like the Art Directors Guild’s Awards and the American Cinema Editors’ Eddie Awards offer some much-deserved accolades to films and artists that often escape the spotlight at the Academy Awards…and they also offer a way for us to narrow down our Oscars betting pools.

Here’s who won big at the ADG Awards and ACE Eddie Awards this weekend.

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