7 Filmmakers Share Their Favorite Keanu Reeves Stories

For three decades now, audiences have been falling in love over and over again with Keanu Reeves. We believe him when he’s saving the world, we believe him when he’s morally ambiguous, and in a few cases, we even believe when he’s the villain. He’s an actor who can transform himself, even when he remains so distinctly, well, Keanu Reeves.

Reeves continues to evolve with the times and only sharpens his skills. What’s not to love about an actor whose movies have blown minds repeatedly as his magnetism and depth deepen with time? Any artist at the stage of Reeves’ career and success who continues growing is doing something right. What has remained from the early days of his acting career is his sincerity and commitment. That sincerity, in particular, is infectious and a part of why audiences and filmmakers remain captivated by him.

With Bill & Ted Face the Music now in theaters and available on VOD, we interviewed directors who’ve worked with Reeves and asked them to share their favorite stories from their collaboration. Here’s what Richard LinklaterChristopher Kenneally, Matthew RossChad Stahelski, Dean Parisot, Francis Lawrence, and Rebecca Miller had to say about their time with the one and only Keanu Reeves.

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Dean Parisot interview

Bill & Ted Face the Music is a very kind-hearted movie. There’s not a single mean-spirited bone in its body. With its unironic heroes, its passion for music, and most importantly, the love between best friends and family, Bill & Ted Face the Music appreciates the best in life.

Whatever obstacles came in the way of the sequel, director Dean Parisot and everyone involved kept going. Parisot, known most famously for the classic Galaxy Quest, delivered a pure sequel with its heart in such the right place. The director, an NYU graduate who won an Oscar for best live-action short film in 1988, told us why he never gave up on Bill & Ted 3 and more.

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Replicas NYCC Panel

How many times can we see the Frankenstein concept of bringing back dead people play out on the big screen, you ask?  Short answer: countless times. Keanu Reeves is starring in Replicas, the latest in a long line of films, mostly told from a male perspective mind you, which tampers with death and recreation. If you haven’t seen it already.

I have nothing against films that explore the idea of cloning. Though, I think BBC America’s small screen gem Orphan Black did an exceptional job taking on themes of feminism, sisterhood, and the politics of science.

But according to Reeves, Replicas is more about how man manipulates nature for his own selfish needs, which makes me significantly less excited about it. “There’s an idea of control, an impulse to create and manifest. This film is having a conversation with that.”

Find out more about what unfolded during the Replicas NYCC panel below. Read More »