The Last of Us Part II Review

Let’s start with something you don’t see in a lot of video game reviews: an accessibility disclaimer. There is unprecedented depth to the number of accessibility options within The Last of Us: Part II. This is intended for those visually/sonically impaired, those with physical disabilities (something that I personally am glad is being addressed), or people that simply don’t play video games enough to properly work a controller but that still want to experience a riveting narrative. With that said, I strongly urge someone to read this review even if they have never played a video game before, as maybe this would be a good starting point and that, from this point forward, games will further keep inclusivity in mind and eradicate gatekeeping.

With that out of the way, it must be set upfront that the bar is already set astronomically high for Game of the Decade, as Naughty Dog’s The Last of Us: Part II (directed by the sole writer of the first game, Neil Druckmann, scribing the decidedly more female-focused sequel alongside Westworld‘s Halley Gross) delivers on its mountainous ambition.

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(This review originally ran during SXSW, in March. As Much Ado About Nothing hits theaters today, we present it once more.)

In the world of drama, nothing is quite as distinct or lovely as the prose of William Shakespeare. His vocabulary, his rhythm, rhymes and descriptions, all established a standard against which others are still measured. Modern day dramatist Joss Whedon also has a distinct style, characterized by wit, humor, and cultural authority. Surely it’s not in the same league as the Bard’s. But with the writer/director’s modern adaptation of Much Ado About Nothing, Whedon has found an enjoyable and surprising balance between the two.

The film will be released June 7, but had its U.S. Premiere this week at South by Southwest. Read more below. Read More »