Quincy Jones Documentary

Alan Hicks and Rashida Jones‘ Quincy get so close and intimate with the great and powerful Quincy Jones you feel like you’re watching a hangout movie. From his youth playing music with Ray Charles, his unforgettable and award-winning film scores, his collaborations with Frank Sinatra and Michael Jackson, and far more, the Netflix documentary goes deep into Jones’ work and accomplishments. However, it also gives any fan of the legend the pleasure of watching him at work and out and about in the world. This doc is probably the closest you’ll ever get to being in Quincy Jones’ company, which is a joyful feeling.

Quincy‘s co-writer and co-director, Alan Hicks, who previously worked with Jones on his directorial debut, Keep on Keeping’ On, first discovered Jones’ music when he was 13 years old and listening to Frank Sinatra Live at the Sands with Count Basie on a loop, which he followed with “Quintessence,” “Quincy Plays Hip Hits,” “This Is How I Feel About Jazz,” and Quincy Jones’ work with Dinah Washington. Hicks recently told us about the opportunity to further explore Jones’ epic body-of-work, telling a sprawling story in two hours, shooting 800 hours of footage, and more.

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Green Band Trailer

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: What better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising?

This week we learn how to live forever, get a retrospective of one of this generation’s most celebrated music producers who isn’t named Diddy, get queer as punk, find out where creativity comes from by just asking the question, and spend some quiet time with Uwe Boll. Read More »