Movies - TV
Tom Hanks Doesn't Have Many Nice Things To Say About The
Da Vinci
Code Trilogy
By WITNEY SEIBOLD
In 2006, Ron Howard’s "The Da Vinci Code” made $760 million worldwide and became a cultural phenomenon, but the hype was dying down by the time the second movie, “Angels & Demons,” was released in 2009. By the time the final movie, “Inferno,” was released in 2016, people could see how bad the first movie was, including its lead, Tom Hanks.
In an interview with The New York Times, Hanks called the series “hooey,” saying, “Dan Brown, God bless him, says, 'Here is a sculpture in a place in Paris! No, it's way over there. See how a cross is formed on a map? Well, it's sort of a cross.' Those are delightful scavenger hunts that are about as accurate to history as the James Bond movies are to espionage.”
While Hanks understood why follow-ups to "The Da Vinci Code” kept being made, as “There's nothing wrong with good commerce, provided it is good commerce,” he acknowledged, “By the time we made the third one, we proved that it wasn't such good commerce.” His words rang true, as “Inferno” opened at $14 million in the US against a budget of $75 million, and was considered a failure, despite eventually making $220 million worldwide.