Movies - TV
Russell T. Davies Had One Rule When It Came To Reinventing Doctor Who
By MICHAEL BOYLE
There were some doubts about how successful a “Doctor Who” revival series would be when producer/writer Russell T. Davies first pitched the idea. The last major adventure for the Doctor had been a direct-to-TV movie that failed to connect to a modern audience, and the show, with its slow pace and cheap sets, began to feel like a relic from the 20th century.
However, the changes Davies introduced quickened the pace, connected the episodes in a season-long arc, and teased a Doctor/companion romance, which reignited interest in the series. One key reason for the revival’s success was Davies’ rule that the Doctor couldn’t be posh like the previous incarnations of the character, which he felt wouldn't connect with a modern audience.
Davies said, “I just thought a tough, war-damaged veteran in an old leather jacket was the right fit for 2005.” Christopher Eccleston was cast as the Ninth Doctor and gave one of the most memorable and impressive performances of any iteration. Helping with its appeal was working-class retail worker Rose Tyler (Billie Piper), who joined the Doctor on adventures she could only dream of having.