Movies - TV
Quentin Tarantino Knew His Over-The-Top Style Wouldn't Work For Jackie Brown
By LYVIE SCOTT
While people would describe a Quentin Tarantino film as highly visual and stylized, his third feature, “Jackie Brown,” is very different. “Jackie Brown” is more lived-in and gritty, which Tarantino said in an interview was done on purpose to fit the story, and was accomplished through the help of cinematographer Guillermo Navarro.
For “Jackie Brown’s” more grounded style, Tarantino referenced is own "Reservoir Dogs," as well as "Straight Time," "Hickey and Boggs" and "They All Laughed.” He explained, "I wanted the entire production to be very down-and-dirty” and “to have richness and depth, but I wanted it to look more 'real."
When contrasting “Jackie Brown” with his other movies, Tarantino said there's a ‘splashy-movie’ quality to them” that he didn’t want in “Jackie Brown.” To achieve the rawness that he wanted, the director enlisted the help of Navarro after seeing his work on “Desperado” and “From Dusk Till Dawn,” and because he knew the cinematographer could “move on the run” like he wanted.