Movies - TV
How Final Destination's DNA Found Its Way Into Wish Upon
By MATTHEW BILODEAU
When a horror film uses the gimmick of a deadly object or person, viewers will likely compare the idea’s concept to others in the genre that came before it. John R. Leonetti’s “Wish Upon” faces such comparisons as the story follows a typical outcast high school student that comes to own a magic Chinese puzzle box that grants wishes at a terrible cost.
Leonetti shared in an interview that he knew “Wish Upon” would likely be compared to the “Final Destination” series, saying, “The audience know that something is going to happen.” Both films become a matter of how and when the characters will die, not if; however, “Wish Upon” differs by lulling the viewers into a false sense of security.
The director first intended to pay homage to Sean William Scott's train-side decapitation scene, but finally opted against it and used it as inspiration in another decapitation scene. They opted to include a loose chainsaw that led a character to lose their head, as opposed to being decapitated by sheet metal from under the tracks.