Movies - TV
12 Fantasy Novels That Deserve To Be Adapted To TV That Aren't Game Of Thrones
By ADAM WESCOTT
Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser
Unlike other heroes of fantasy epics, “Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser” prefer food, sex, and money to honor and duty, but this weakness makes the scoundrels appealing. Another charming aspect of the series, especially for a television adaptation, is how weird the stories can be — a talented writers’ room could have a field day with this series.
The Sarantine Mosaic
Guy Gavriel Kay’s “The Sarantine Mosaic” is a duology about empires, chariot-racing, and art-making that features memorable characters and tangible worlds. Kay’s work precedes “Game of Thrones” in evoking actual history for the setting while also featuring world-shaking magic, albeit more restrained than George R.R. Martin.
Swordspoint
The “Swordspoint” books are less traditional epic fantasy than a classic family saga, filled with big emotions, schemes within schemes, and close-knit relationships between difficult people. Although an awkward sell in the fantasy market, in the wake of a show like “Our Flag Means Death,” it could be an easy pitch in today’s TV market.
The Farseer Trilogy
Robin Hobb’s “Farseer Trilogy” does an excellent job of putting the readers in the character’s shoes, causing many fantasy fans of a certain age to devour these books. The series prioritizes complex, messy characters over epic plots, providing an abundance of excellent material for actors to dig into and an extensive world for any adaptation.
So You Want to Be a Wizard
“So You Want to be a Wizard” follows the adventures of Nita and Kit, two children given the responsibility of magical powers, and sets the two on immediate adventures across the multiverse. The “Young Wizard” book series includes science fiction elements and complex ethical quandaries that would make for a great TV adaptation.