Greyhound streaming

Greyhound, the new World War II movie starring Tom Hanks, was originally slated to hit theaters in March of last year. But it got pushed to January 2020, then moved back to May, and then bumped to June. Ultimately, the movie never hit theaters at all, because Apple swooped in, purchased the distribution rights, and decided to debut it directly on the AppleTV+ streaming service. The movie will be available for subscribers to stream in just a few days, but it sounds like Hanks – who also produced Greyhound and wrote the screenplay – has some conflicted feelings about that. Read More »

greyhound premiere

Tom Hanks’ obsession with quiet, persistent heroism first became truly evident with Apollo 13. That 1995 film is a thrilling piece of real-life drama, in which there are no real villains and heroism is embodied by good, honorable men doing good, honorable work, both in outer space and on the ground. There’s not a lot of flash or flamboyance in the film, nor in subsequent history-driven miniseries and films either starring or overseen by Hanks, from Band of Brothers to Saving Private Ryan. But the height of quiet, unassuming heroism is best typified by the events depicted in Greyhound. This new war drama aspires to be peak Dad Movie, yet winds up like a History Channel movie with a big-name lead.

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da 5 bloods vietnam

(Welcome to The Soapbox, the space where we get loud, feisty, political, and opinionated about anything and everything.)

Da 5 Bloods is a ghost story. It’s about the ghosts that exist in the minds of Vietnam War veterans — played here with stunning ferocity and pain by Delroy Lindo, Jonathan Majors, Clarke Peters, Norm Lewis, and Isiah Whitlock Jr. — haunted by the deeds they committed fighting a war that was not theirs. It’s about the ghosts of racism and imperialism that continue to thrive in contemporary society. But the most terrifying ghost in Da 5 Bloods is the ghost of the Vietnam War itself, which continues to haunt the American conscience to this day. In American minds, and in the Hollywood movies through which they process their guilt, the Vietnam War still stands as the great American failure — the war that represented the downfall of the U.S. as the shining beacon of democracy.

But with Da 5 Bloods, Spike Lee repurposes the typical Vietnam War movie narrative, which has long been an ode to the last gasps of traditional American masculinity, to instead examine Black trauma and reckon with the devastating consequences that American violence has wrought upon the world and its own citizens. Lee interweaves the familiar war narrative and iconography with the modern-day context of Black Lives Matter and America’s inherited racism (given form by Donald Trump’s “MAGA” movement), which in turn act in concert with the lingering effects of French imperialism in Vietnam. The oppression that Black people suffered at the hands of their own government, Lee suggests, is analogous to the oppression that the Vietnamese people suffered at the hands of American soldiers. The war is always being waged, Da 5 Bloods implies, whether it’s a war against white supremacy or a war against racism.

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greyhound premiere

Update: According to The Wrap, Greyhound is now set to hit the high seas on AppleTV+ beginning on July 10, 2020. Our original story from May 19, 2020 can be read below.

Tom Hanks‘ World War II drama Greyhound is heading straight to streaming on Apple TV+. The much-delayed Sony drama — originally set to open in theaters in March 2019, before getting pushed to January 2019, then to May 8, 2020 and finally to June 12, 2020 — will now forego theaters entirely and steer right to streaming waters, making its premiere on Apple TV+ as the platform’s biggest feature film debut yet.

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da 5 bloods review

Like a blast of dynamite, like a punch to the gut, here comes Da 5 Bloods, the new Spike Lee Joint that arrives during a month when protests against violence aimed at Black lives continue to spread throughout the country. Lee made his film before the current climate, but in many ways, it feels almost prescient as it deals with African-Americans fighting for rights they’ve been denied for centuries. It’s not a preachy film, but it is underscored with the undeniable acknowledgment of that fight. “We been dying for this country from the very get, hoping one day they’d give us our rightful place,” says a character played by Chadwick Boseman. “All they give us is a foot up our ass.”

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da 5 bloods posters

A new Spike Lee joint is always worth getting excited about, but to have one arrive now, at this particular time, seems essential. Lee’s latest, Da Five Bloods, is hitting Netflix next week, and ahead of that streaming release, several fantastic new posters have found their way online. You can see the posters, along with some words from Lee, below.

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the outpost

Will movie theaters across the country really be open by July? That’s still the hope, although everyone has their doubts. As of now, the big movie everyone is looking at is Tenet, which Warner Bros. still hopes to open on July 17. But it’s not the only July movie with eyes on a July theatrical release. There’s also the Russell Crowe movie Unhinged, which is allegedly opening July 1. And now there’s another film to add to the list: The Outpost, an adaptation of Jake Tapper’s book of the same name. Scott Eastwood, Caleb Landry Jones, and Orlando Bloom star in the film, which follows U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan.

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da 5 bloods release date

With movie theaters out of commission as quarantine stretches on, it was unknown when we’d see the new Spike Lee joint. But the BlacKkKlansman director always keeps us on our toes — announcing the surprise release of his new war drama, Da 5 Bloods, on Netflix. Lee took to Twitter to announce the Da 5 Bloods release date, which will be premiering globally on the streamer this June.

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War is hell but it sometimes provides the backdrop for great movies. The recent Blu-ray release of 1917, followed by the 50th anniversary, this week, of the Oscar-winning Patton, starring George C. Scott, is as good an excuse as any for cinephiles to hunker down in the trenches of an impromptu war movie marathon (especially if you’re stuck at home right now due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic).

With that in mind, here’s a mission for you, soldier: work your way through this chronological list of the best war movies of the last fifty years. “Best” is ultra-subjective, of course, but when you’re Alamo-ed up in a fort of pillows in your living room and there’s nothing good on television, few of these movies should disappoint.

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1917 featurette new

The “hidden man” is how editor Lee Smith sees himself in 1917. Not for a second did Smith want audiences paying attention to his cuts or tricks, but to instead immerse themselves in director Sam Mendes‘ World War I story, which is constructed to take place in one seemingly unbroken take. Despite the obvious technical wizardry and razzle-dazzle, they pulled it off. Audiences were caught up in the feeling and exhilaration of 1917, not the craft of 1917.

The war pic isn’t the first time Smith and Mendes collaborated. The two worked together on Spectre, which involved a long take that gave the editor and filmmaker some ideas of how to accomplish 1917. Outside of Smith’s collaborations with Mendes, he’s edited several Christopher Nolan films, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, and an underrated gem from the early 2000s, Buffalo Soldiers.

Recently, Smith spoke to us about his intense work on 1917, a few of the movie’s standout sequences, and doing what hasn’t been done before.

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