computer screen movies

Computer screen movies – stuff like Unfriended and Searching – are becoming more and more popular, and we have one person to thank for that: Timur Bekmambetov. The filmmaker and producer is at the forefront of “Screenlife“, a technology that tells stories through computer screens. And Bekmambetov doesn’t plan on stopping – he’s currently developing 14 computer screen movies, across a variety of genres. The question is: does the general public want to see them?

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crazy rich asians asian-american

When American-born Rachel Chu (Constance Wu) meets her boyfriend Nick’s mother Eleanor Young (Michelle Yeoh) for the first time at their lush Singaporean mansion in Crazy Rich Asians, she enthusiastically lists off her accomplishments: lauded economics professor at NYU, talented, brilliant, probably played piano since elementary school. It’s a check list that any Asian-American parent would beam at, but to which Eleanor only coolly responds, “Pursuing one’s passion…how American.”

This fleeting confrontation toward the beginning of the film perfectly illustrates the divide between Asians and Asian-Americans that both communities still try to navigate today. And surprisingly, Crazy Rich Asians’ conflict between filial piety and passion gets to the heart of the muddled, ill-defined Asian-American identity.

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Romantic comedies have been a storytelling staple ever since Shakespeare introduced the world to Benedick and Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing, but the genre really found its footing in film with It Happened One Night in 1934. Frank Capra’s simple tale of a runaway heiress (Claudette Colbert) and an ambitious reporter (Clark Gable) was the first of only three features in history to sweep the Academy Awards in all major categories.

Clearly, a humorous spin on a romantic story resonated with audiences and the genre continued to thrive through the days of Hepburn and Monroe. However, the modern rom-com we know and love today really found its stride in 1989 with Rob Reiner’s When Harry Met Sally. Nora Ephron, the godmother of rom-com writing, asked one simple question in her script, “Can a man and a woman just be friends?” and an entire era was born.

From ’89 to ’09, the cinemas were booming with clumsy, career-obsessed women who found a love they weren’t even looking for by simply bumping into an unsuspecting man with an alarmingly handsome face. For two whole decades, we were blessed with Hanks and Ryan, Julia Roberts and whoever, Nancy Meyers vehicles, and the firm affirmation that Christmas was the most romantic time of year.

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Jon M. Chu interview

Crazy Rich Asians is helping to bring a so-so summer moviegoing season to an end with a bang. Director Jon M. Chu has not only made a romantic comedy that’s the sort of charming, character-driven studio spectacle we want but rarely see this time of year, but also a movie that’s touching a lot of audiences. For Chu, who previously directed two of the finest Step Up films and G.I. Joe: Retaliation, the incredible response to his adaptation of  Kevin Kwan‘s bestselling novel has been emotional and surprising.

Chu has made a romantic comedy oozing with charm, genuine romance, and visual splendor. With star-driven romantic comedies seemingly dying out, the electric chemistry between Candace Wu and Henry Golding is a breath of fresh air and makes for some exceptional escapism. It’s a complete and utter joy. Recently, Chu spoke with us about the romance at the center of the story, the response to the film so far, his collaborations with Kevin Kwan and the cast, and some of the movie’s standout scenes.

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All About Nina Trailer

Mary Elizabeth Winstead has enjoyed quite the eclectic career in film, ranging from indie roles in the likes of Smashed and Swiss Army Man to more mainstream flicks like Live Free or Die Hard, 10 Cloverfield Lane and Scott Pilgrim vs the World. More recently she’s been comfortable on television with a role in FX’s series adaptation of Fargo, but this fall, she returns to theaters as a stand-up comedian.

All About Nina follows Mary Elizabeth Winstead as a blunt, struggling stand-up comic who covers all the usual rough and tumble about life and relationships. And we get to see all the highs and lows of this life from a troublesome and abusive boyfriend (Chace Crawford) to a new love interest (Common) that she seems likely to screw up somehow. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

crazy rich asians trivia

Warner Bros. is hoping to shake things up this month with Crazy Rich Asians, the first Asian-American-focused studio movie in more than two decades. But the reason the movie is coming to theaters in the first place is because of a key decision made by author Kevin Kwan, who wrote the book on which the movie is based, and director Jon M. Chu, who both turned down a greenlighted trilogy and massive paydays if the project ended up going to Netflix.

Making sure this movie got in front of audiences in traditional theaters was so important that they ended up going with Warner Bros.
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the time traveler's wife series

Steven Moffat can’t get away from making shows about time travelers, just like Rachel McAdams can’t get away from playing their wives. But McAdams likely won’t be starring in HBO’s series adaptation of The Time Traveler’s Wife, which Moffat is on board to develop. It’s familiar terrain for the former showrunner and writer of the U.K.’s longest-running time traveling sci-fi show, Doctor Who.

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jungle cruise announcement

Welcome aboard Jungle Cruise, where Dwayne Johnson wears a tiny captain’s hat, Emily Blunt is elegantly disheveled, and Johnson totally messes up Katherine Hepburn’s name. He insults a legend! How dare he! But we’ll forgive him this once because of that adorable little captain’s cap that looks too tiny atop the Rock’s giant body — which isn’t wearing a khaki shirt for once!

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crazy rich asians tracking

Crazy Rich Asians is looking at a crazy solid opening weekend at the box office. Early tracking numbers estimate that the Jon M. Chu romantic-comedy based on the Kevin Kwan novel of the same name will open to a respectable $18 million. Not crazy rich, but not crazy terrible either.

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to all the boys i've loved before trailer

It’s been a good summer for rom-coms — if you have a Netflix subscription, that is. The streaming giant is singlehandedly bringing back the struggling genre to our computer screens, and it seems like their latest offering is as delightful and sweet as its predecessors.

Based on Jenny Han’s bestselling YA novel, To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before is a high school romantic-comedy about a teenager whose secret love letters accidentally get sent to each of her five crushes. Chaos, hijinks, and of course, romance ensues. Now a full trailer for To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before has been released ahead of the film’s August debut.

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