Big Time Adolescence Review

Every Sundance Film Festival comes with a handful of coming-of-age narratives showing kids struggling with adolescence in a variety of ways. At Sundance, teens frequently feel like outcasts, have their hearts broken, deal with shitty parents, hang out with unique friends, find inspiration from 1980s music and movies, and learn important lessons. First-time writer/director Jason Orley falls into some of these tropes with his own coming of age comedy Big Time Adolescence, but thankfully, a pair of endearing and hilarious lead performances from teenage Griffin Gluck and comedy prodigy Pete Davidson turn the movie into a real gem. Read More »

the mourner cast

Ezra Miller is keeping busy. While his two big blockbuster franchises have crawled to a halt, the Fantastic Beasts and Justice League actor is signing on to star in an intriguing indie project based on a Japanese novel Arata Tendo. Miller has signed on to lead The Mourner, an emotional drama film directed by Casper Kiriya (Casshern).

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big shark

Hey, what do you think Tommy Wiseau has been up to? If you guessed “Making a shark movie,” you are correct. The auteur behind The Room has revealed a look at his new movie, which is called, appropriately enough, Big Shark. The film is set in New Orleans, and focuses on three firefighters trying to save the world…from a big shark.

Or maybe, just maybe, this is all a big joke. More on Big Shark below!

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trailer roundup drunk parents

Worried that trailers for some smaller films might have fallen through the cracks? Worry no more! The following trailer roundup gathers together the odds and ends of the movie preview world, and brings them together in one convenient location. Talk about a deal! Indie comedies, documentaries, biopics, horror and more all await you below.

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Blinded by the Light Review

Everyone has that one movie, TV show, book, or album that came along at the perfect time in their life. Just when everything felt like it was crumbling around you, this incredible piece of art lifted you up to make everything seem like it might be all right. In the irresistible coming-of-age indie Blinded by the Light, this revelation comes to a teenage Pakistani boy named Javed (Viveik Kalra) when he needs it the most. Suffocated by a small town, forced into a career he doesn’t want, and harassed by Neo-Nazis, Javed suddenly finds inspiration in an unlikely hero: Bruce Springsteen. Read More »

The Last Black Man in San Francisco review

At last year’s Sundance Film Festival, both Blindspotting and Sorry to Bother You weaved Oakland’s gentrification into their underlying stories. At this year’s fest, co-writer/director and fifth generation San Franciscan Joe Talbot addresses the subject in an even more direct way with his memorable debut film, The Last Black Man in San FranciscoRead More »

The Death of Dick Long review

Pink Freud, the fictional band in The Death of Dick Long, consists of Dick, Zeke, and Earl – three Alabama rednecks who stumble their way through covers of songs like Staind’s 2001 hit “It’s Been Awhile.” One night after band practice, Dick poses a fateful question to his pals: “Ya’ll motherfuckers wanna get weird?”

After a late-night montage of shotgunning beers, blasting cans with shotguns, and launching fireworks from between their legs, there’s a hard cut to a few hours later, when Dick has been horrifically injured. Zeke and Earl drop him off outside the emergency room, but it’s not long before they learn Dick didn’t make it – and the audience spends the first hour of the movie wondering exactly how he died as the survivors dig themselves bigger and bigger holes with their ill-conceived lies to cover up the events of the previous night. When the reason for Dick’s fate finally arrives, the movie takes a turn away from its comedic roots and becomes a more disturbing, melancholy exploration of masculinity. Read More »

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind review

Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave, Doctor Strange) wrote, directed, and stars in The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, a testament to the power of education and science and a movie that feels like a revolutionary act in 2019 America. As world leaders continue to ignore climate change, Ejiofor’s movie provides a sliver of hope through a true story of resilience and ingenuity in the face of overwhelming odds. Read More »

Troop Zero review

From its opening shot that travels from the Big Dipper all the way down to the small town of Wiggly, Georgia in 1977, Troop Zero, a Southern-fried comedy from female co-directors Bert & Bertie, seems to constantly walk the line of being too precocious and cute for its own good. But even though its jokes don’t always land, the film is still a pleasant, largely charming diversion and further proof that Viola Davis can elevate any movie she’s in. Read More »

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I Am Mother review

Raised in total isolation by a robot, a young woman’s world is turned upside down when a survivor from the outside bangs on their airlock door one day. What is true? What is real? Is there a difference between the two?

I Am Mother takes a familiar premise and executes it to near-perfection, with first-time feature filmmaker Grant Sputore aided by a fantastic script, a star-making performance from UK actress Clara Rugaard, a strong supporting turn from Hilary Swank, and a brilliantly realized new robot that instantly cements its status in the pantheon of classic genre creations. Put this on your radar – you don’t want to miss it. Read More »