The Lobster review

Audiences have come to expect the bizarre from director Yorgos Lanthimos, who broke out in 2009 with the wonderful and unsettling Dogtooth, and The Lobster definitely doesn’t disappoint on that front. It’s set in a dystopia where single people are transformed into animals; the title refers to the animal that Colin Farrell‘s David has chosen to become if he can’t find a mate.

If weird were all The Lobster had going for it, though, it’d be little more than an experimental curiosity. What makes The Lobster must-see viewing is the film’s pitch-black sense of humor, its uncomfortably keen insights into real-life relationships, and even, in spite of everything else, its aching romanticism.  Read More »


Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

Emma Stone in Irrational Man

Yorgos Lanthimos is lining up a high-powered cast for The Favourite, as Kate Winslet, Emma Stone, and Olivia Colman have all entered talks to star. That’s not too surprising, considering the success he’s had with Dogtooth and now The Lobster. No, the weird part is how un-weird it sounds. As far as we can tell, The Favourite is a pretty straightforward historical drama.

Get details on the Emma Stone Yorgos Lanthimos movie after the jump.  Read More »

The Lobster (1)

When you’re single and lonely, it can feel like the whole world is full of smug couples judging you for your solo status. In Yorgos LanthimosThe Lobster, they literally are. Singlehood is a crime in this society, and those caught committing it are given 45 days to find a mate, or else be turned into an animal of their choosing.

It’s an absurd premise, but we’d expect no less from the director of Dogtooth. In this strange dystopia, David (Colin Farrell) meets and falls for a woman from another community, where coupledom is strictly forbidden. Watch The Lobster trailer after the jump. Read More »

Lobster Lanthimos First Look

Above is your first look at what might be one of the weirdest movies of the year. Doesn’t look so strange, does it? But this is the first shot from The Lobster, by Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos (Dogtooth, Alps). That should tell you something right off. And we’re guessing that in the film, we’ll see one of these three guys, Colin FarrellBen Whishaw, and John C. Reilly, turned into an animal. How? Read more below.  Read More »

John C Reilly Lobster

The director of Dogtooth and Alps is now shooting his new film, but this one is a bit different than the two art-house offerings that made Yorgos Lanthimos a festival favorite. The new film is The Lobster, which is described in brief as a “dystopian love story.” It will be the director’s first English-language film. The cast is something else indeed: John C. Reilly has just signed on to The Lobster, along with Ashley Jensen (Ugly Betty), Michael Smiley (The World’s End), and Jessica Barden (Far From the Madding Crowd). Read More »


Briefly: Greek filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos, who directed Alps and Dogtooth, is making his first English-language feature. The Lobster is “an unconventional love story” that has been coming together for a while now. What makes it unconventional? The fact that it is set in a dystopian future isn’t all that odd in the days of rampant YA adaptations, and the fact that this particular future makes it “a matter of life or death” to find a life partner isn’t even the unusual bit. No, there’s something in the script about people being transformed into animals if they don’t fit in. Yeah, that’s the unusual part.

Most of the cast has been set since last fall, but Jason Clarke seems to have dropped out, and Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz are now on board. They join the previously cast Ben Whishaw, Lea Seydoux, Olivia Colman, Ariane Labed and Aggeliki Papoulia. Lanthimos wrote with frequent collaborator Efthimis Filippou, and we can’t wait to see what weirdness they’ve cooked up. [THR]

Cool Posts From Around the Web:


Dogtooth and Alps director Yorgos Lanthimos is going to bring his signature style of skewed narrative to an English-language film.

His next movie is The Lobster, described as “an unconventional love story” that has a slightly sci-fi bent. What sort of sci-fi bent, exactly? How about this: if people don’t comply with the rules of their society, they are transformed into animals. Got your attention?

Now it has a cast, with Jason Clarke (Lawless, Zero Dark Thirty) and Léa Seydoux (Blue Is the Warmest Color, Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol) signing on alongside Ben Whishaw (Skyfall, Cloud Atlas), Olivia Colman (Broadchurch), Ariane Labed (Alps) and Angeliki Papoulia (Dogtooth).

Read More »

Yorgos Lanthimos got our attention with Dogtooth — hell, he got the world’s attention with the film — but he isn’t the only person responsible for that film and its follow-up, Alps.

Efthimis Filippou wrote both Dogtooth and Alps, and Dogtooth was shot by Thimios Bakatakis. Now there is L, directed by Babis Makridis and co-written by Filippou and shot by Bakatakis. The film is a Sundance entry, and has the tagline “What is the best vehicle in the world? A movie about walking.”

Now there is also a teaser for L; it certainly displays the deft touch that Bakatakis has with lighting. And for those who are fans of Dogtooth, there is an odd sensibility here that will prove instantly endearing. Read More »

Since the film debuted at Venice, I’ve been trying to avoid reviews of Alps, the new film by Dogtooth director Yorgos Lanthimos. I’ve seen headlines and brief quotes that are generally positive; those, a couple trailers and the basic synopsis are all I’m willing to see before going into the film. (The synopsis is easy: a small group of people, led by a man who calls himself Mont Blanc, form a service to help people grieve by standing in for their departed loved ones.)

Now we know that there will definitely be chances to see Alps on US screens, as Kino Lorber has picked up the film for distribution. It won’t be around until next spring, which is quite a while to wait, but better that than no distribution at all.

If you’re also eager to see the next effort from the Dogtooth director, check out a new trailer below. The dialogue is entirely in Greek, but you’ll be able to get an idea of the character of the film, at the very least. Those who’ve seen the director’s last film will recognize certain elements and impulses very quickly. Read More »