The Princess Bride

Buttercup and Wesley’s epic romance took them from an idyllic farm to a castle, a torture chamber, the high seas, and the Fire Swamp. Now it’s also bringing them to the theater.

Disney Theatrical Productions is working on a stage adaptation of The Princess Bride, with Alan Horn shepherding for the studio. William Goldman, who wrote the 1973 novel on which Rob Reiner‘s 1987 film was based, will collaborate. Hit the jump for more details.

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Rob Reiner‘s The Princess Bride, written by William Goldman, is 25 years old this year and well on its way to becoming a classic. The classic storybook adventure, framed as a grandfather reading it to his grandson, blends action, romance, suspense and humor in just the right way that it’s hard to find a flaw. Fans surely have discussed what could happen with Westley, Buttercup and the rest of the characters but a sequel has never been something they demanded.

Goldman originally wrote the novel in the 1970s and at a recent screening for the film’s anniversary, admitted that he actually wants to write a sequel but just hasn’t been able to come up with a good enough idea. Read his exact quote and discuss after the jump. Read More »

Brian De Palma has been actively looking for new film projects, and it looks like he will shoot the film Passion in the next few months. But he’s also setting up something to do later this year: if things work out, a deal in the works at the Berlin Film Festival will see the director behind the camera for a remake of the 1986 Burt Reynolds thriller Heat. (Released in the US in ’87, so you’ll often see it listed as an ’87 movie.)

Jason Statham will be in the Reynolds role. More detail follows, including the reason I’m fairly interested in this remake. Read More »

The Seventies provided some of the greatest dramas of all time. Films like The Godfather, Taxi Driver, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Network remain as dramatic today as they were then. In that time, though, film historians have uncovered much of the behind the scenes drama that happened on these classic films and, in some cases, it’s better than what happened on screen.

The latest case of this is a claim by Robert Redford that legendary, Oscar-winning screenwriter William Goldman didn’t actually write All The President’s Men, Alan J. Pakula‘s multiple Oscar-winner starring Redford and Dustin Hoffman as Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, two Washington Post reporters who eventually blew the lid off the Watergate scandal.

In Michael Feeney Callan‘s new biography on Redford called Robert Redford: The Biography, Redford tells a story of how he and Pakula spent a month rewriting Goldman’s script before shooting. Is he telling the truth? Another piece of investigative journalism says “No.” Read More »

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