Will Smith Regrets Wild Wild West

Will Smith was once the king of the summer. After hits like Independence Day and Men in Black made huge bank during blockbuster season, So Warner Bros. thought they could count on rack up some cash for the studio with a film adaptation of the classic TV show Wild Wild West, and they weren’t entirely wrong.

Wild Wild West raked in $222 million worldwide on a budget of $170 million, but it was obliterated by critics, and there’s probably been no moment in time where someone has unironically wanted to watch Wild Wild West at home. One of the worst summer blockbusters ever, Wild Wild West is an absolute nightmare, and Will Smith knew it.

After 17 years, Will Smith seems to be sorry for convincing audiences to go see a movie that featured Kenneth Branagh with some of the most ridiculous facial hair ever, Kevin Kline in drag, and a giant mechanical spider. Find out why Will Smith regrets Wild Wild West and what ultimately made him decide never to make a movie for the same reasons ever again. Read More »

Gabriel Hardman interview

In 1993, at only 19 years old, an aspiring comic book artist named Gabriel Hardman got what appeared to be a big break: the chance to pencil Marvel’s War Machine. But not long after completing the assignment, Hardman chose to ditch comics, move to Hollywood and try to make it as a storyboard artist.

By any measure of success, there’s no doubt that Hardman “made it.” Over the next two decades, he worked on a variety of beloved and/or critically acclaimed projects; ranging from Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery (1997) to Interstellar (2014). But at the same time, while on that upward trajectory, he storyboarded a handful famous flops. Including three films which have been the focus of How Did This Get Made? episodes: Wild Wild West, Spider-Man 3 and Green Lantern.

Interestingly enough, it took a frustrating experience on one of those three films to lead Hardman back to the career he had previously left. And, since then, he has regularly toggled between working in comics (such as Invisible Republic and Heathentown) and working on films (such as Inception and The Dark Knight Rises). To learn more about this unexpected journey, we spoke with Gabriel Hardman about some of the ups and downs in his career.

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With his Battlestar Galactica prequel Caprica recently canceled in favor of a more action packed spin-off, Ron Moore – the brain child behind the successful 2004 re-imagining of Galactica – now finds himself showless. Or does he? It seems Moore might be leaving space in favor of both the seven seas and the Old West. Moore just sold an action adventure series called The McCulloch to NBC; it centers on a fictional Coast Guard cutter that travels around the world. He’s also one of two producers attached to a remake of the 1960s show The Wild Wild West which, though it was rumored before, is now being set up at CBS. Read more about both after the jump. Read More »


The last time the TV show Wild Wild West was revamped, it resulted in an atrocious Barry Sonnenfeld film that stands as one of the more forgettable big-budget pictures of the ’90s. But the last time Ronald D. Moore revamped a show the result was the new Battlestar Galactica, which was better than anyone would ever have expected. So what will we get out of Mr. Moore’s new take on the classic Western show?

EW says the new Wild Wild West is in very early stages, with at least weeks before networks get a crack at buying it. The original show starred Robert Conrad and Ross Martin as Secret Service agents sent to patrol a territory in the Old West. What will this new one offer? With that setup there’s plenty of room for the mix of character, espionage and political commentary that made Battlestar Galactica so great.

After the break, Terra Nova gets a female lead, and Guillermo del Toro adds another possible project to his plate. Read More »


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