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As you probably know by now, Gallery1988 will be holding their third annual pop culture art show Crazy4Cult 3D from July 16th to August 8th in Los Angeles. Over the past couple weeks we’ve featured a couple of the fantastic art that will be on display at the show, including Jeff Boyes’ take on Luc Besson’s 1994 film The Professional, and Jim Horwat’s Back to the Future Tribute. We should have a couple more exclusive looks in the coming weeks, but lets first take a look at some of the other fantastic art which has begun to appear around the interwebs.
tom whalen's army of darkness posterWe’ve featured some of Tom Whalen’s art in past editions of Cool Stuff (posters, Dark Knight magazine cover, Watchmen art, The Shining and The Warriors, Predator, 80′s super villains). Whalen has created two pieces for the Crazy4Cult 3D show, the first of which is this poster for Sam Raimi’s Army of Darkness. Apparently a limited edition run of 70 prints will be available at the show, or by contacting the gallery afterwards. We’ll keep you updated when and if these become available outside the show. You can see more of Tom’s wonderful artwork on deviantart.

zz139052d5You have also seen some of Dave Perillo‘s art in past editions of Cool Stuff (Random art, Watchmen, The Joker, Ghostbusters). For Crazy4Cult 3D he has created a 70′s or 80′s style board game based on The Goonies. Like Whalen, this is just the first of two pieces he will have on display at the show. They will also be making a limited edition run of 50 16″ x 20″ giclee prints signed and numbered. Check out more of Perillo’s art on deviant art. Gallery1988 is using the image on post cards to promote the show. Click on the image in the header of this post to get a better look.

al of the dead

In honor of the 20th anniversary of UHF, Keith Noordzy has created “Al of the Dead”.

Pee-Wee Herman's Big Adventure

Daniel Rizzolo created this awesome oil on board Pee-Wee Herman’s Big Adventure-inspired piece “I’m a Loner, a Rebel”.

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Cool Stuff is a daily feature of slashfilm.com. Know of any geekarific creations or cool products which should be featured on Cool Stuff? E-Mail us at orfilms@gmail.com.

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Last month, /Film visited the set of H2 (Halloween 2). After flying into Atlanta, Georgia, a colleague and I followed a publicity firm’s map and drove far out into the country, down winding roads encased by high trees that exhaled into healthy farmland. The sun was setting, the temperature was cooling, and our cell phones were no longer getting reception. We were lost. We finally came to a local cop car blocking a road, lights on spin. The cop exited—he was alive—and said, “Here for the movie?” and pointed us in the direction of Haddonfield, a fictional town that millions of people all over the world have watched Michael Myers terrorize for years.

Since 2007, the grisly lore of Haddonfield has rested in the determined hands of writer/director Rob Zombie. And in my opinion, so does the current state and fate of the American horror film, an institution predictably oft-sniffed at, but that is vital to our culture. As exemplified in our epic interview—divided into two parts—Zombie is a filmmaker who is unapologetically forthright about detractors of his vision for Halloween and horror, and much more. There is great irony to be found in that so many 20somethings wake up to Zombie’s music cuing The Howard Stern Show, and that the same guy is creating cinema that aspires to haunt our grandkids’ nightmares more so than the last president. (Click here for part two of the interview.)

Hunter Stephenson: In December, it was officially announced that you were on board for the sequel. So, between then and the release date this August, you have had to write, cast, prep, shoot and now you guys are editing. That’s such a small window. When you first sat down to write the script, where did you want to go with Myers and this new mythology you created?

Rob Zombie: Well, I looked back at the first film and I thought, What would be the most realistic fall-out from the events that occurred previously? So, I started with Laurie Strode. The reality now is this: here is a girl who wakes up, her parents are murdered, most of her friends are murdered, and she finds out her brother is the person who killed everybody. What is the reality of that? What does that do to a person? I felt it would be much more interesting this time to make Laurie this dark, damaged character. And everyone else too.

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