It Comes at Night misleading trailer

(Welcome to The Soapbox, the space where we get loud, feisty, and opinionated about something that makes us very happy…or fills us with indescribable rage. In this edition: the excellent marketing for It Comes at Night is doing the movie a disservice.)

The trailers for It Comes at Night have been magnificent and the folks at A24 (or whoever they employed to edit them) should be commended. Each preview has evoked a menace and a terror rarely found in horror movie marketing. I have watched as that trailer made entire audiences grow tense. I have felt my wife, a huge horror fan, nudge me in the side, her non-verbal way of saying “take me to see that, please.”

Removed from the trailers, It Comes at Night is an excellent movie and writer/director Trey Edward Shults, his cast, and his crew should also be commended. In a summer filled with bombastic blockbusters, it’s a disturbing, patient, and upsetting experience that crawls under your skin and festers. It’s the kind of movie that will find an audience – people who will want to talk about it for some time to come.

But here’s the thing: It Comes at Night, while certainly worth your time and money, is not the movie A24 is selling. At all. In any way. And that’s not going to sit well with some audiences.

Read More »

it comes at night trailer

It Comes at Night opens this week and it brings a blast of unsettling, arthouse horror into the stifling summer movie season. Well, “blast” may not be the right word – this is a patient, uneasy, and downright creepy movie that deliberately avoids offering instant satisfaction or clear answers. This approach only makes the film more upsetting.

And writer/director Trey Edward Shults wouldn’t have it any other way. Like his previous film, the micro-budgeted drama Krisha, Shults has made a very personal film here, albeit one set in the post-apocalypse that follows two families sharing one roof in the woods while a virus destroys civilization elsewhere. Speaking with Shults, he was open about his influences (everyone from Stanley Kubrick to John Cassavetes), writing a horror movie as therapy, and plunging the audience into a nightmare.

Read More »

it comes at night trailer

I was able to see director Trey Edward ShultsIt Comes At Night a few weeks ago and I agree with our own Alex Riviello, who reviewed it from the world premiere at the Overlook Film Festival: it’s a really good movie. It is also not the movie being presented in this new preview, which could be a problem for some audiences.

So watch the new It Comes at Night trailer below, but understand that the movie arriving in theaters next week isn’t the movie being advertised.

Read More »

it comes at night review

[It Comes At Night premiered as a secret screening at the Overlook Film Festival this weekend. The film came right from the edit bay, and while it’s not final, (they’re still working on a few effects, and it contained no credits) the picture is locked.]

It Comes At Night is either a survivalist’s greatest dream or biggest nightmare. It touches on something that many people have hidden away in the dark recesses of their minds, a plan for when civilization collapses and you have to fend for yourself. It usually involves a secluded location deep in the woods, and with more than a couple of guns.

That’s the case for young Travis (Kelvin Harrison, Jr.), who lives in a secured and heavily armed home with his parents (Joel Edgerton and Carmen Ejogo.) Society might be gone for all they know, because they’ve been living far out in the woods for quite a while, surviving day-to-day.

Read More »

It Comes At Night trailer

The trailer for It Comes At Night has been released and it looks like a stunning psychological thriller.

Trey Edward Schults‘ anticipated follow-up to his lauded debut film Krisha, It Comes At Night looks like it will be a worthy and tense second film from the promising director.

Read More »

it comes at night trailer

It’s easy to roll your eyes at movie trailers, to scoff at how people are sometimes more obsessed with film marketing than films themselves. On some days, I agree. On other days, the It Comes at Night trailer arrives and reminds me that there’s a genuine art to cutting a great movie trailer and that the best of the bunch can evoke a film’s atmosphere without falling into the trap of summarizing the entire movie in two minutes.

And the arrival of the It Comes at Night trailer serves as a reminder that Trey Edward Shults, the director of the critically acclaimed Krisha, has gone and made a horror movie starring Joel Edgerton for his sophomore feature and that is very, very interesting.

Read More »