The Danish Girl trailer

Eddie Redmayne began 2015 as an unhinged space prince (or something?) in Jupiter Ascending, but as the year starts winding back down he’s heading back to the prestige-picture track. Focus Features has released the first trailer for Tom Hooper‘s The Danish Girl, starring Redmayne as transgender pioneer Lili Elbe. Alicia Vikander plays Elbe’s wife Gerda Wegener. Watch The Danish Girl trailer after the jump. Read More »


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First Look: Eddie Redmayne Is ‘The Danish Girl’

Eddie Redmayne in Jupiter Ascending

Eddie Redmayne is following up his Oscar win for The Theory of Everything with another biopic. The Danish Girl stars Redmayne as Lili Elbe, an early 20th century painter who became one of the first people to undergo gender reassignment surgery. Get your The Danish Girl first look after the jump.  Read More »

the danish girl

After winning an Oscar for The King’s Speech, Tom Hooper went bigger: he adapted the novel-turned-musical Les Miserables on large scale. Since then, he’s flirted with a few projects but has yet to settle on one. Now, a very interesting new option has revealed itself. One of his Les Mis cast members is along for the potentially controversial ride.

Hooper is attached to direct Eddie Redmayne in The Danish Girl, an adaptation of novel by David Ebershoff. It tells the true story of artist Einar Wegener who was one of the first people ever to have gender reassignment surgery. Read More »

The small screen regularly attracts many big screen filmmakers to film 30 and 60 second television commercials, but the Super Bowl is the premiere for many of these new spots. So beyond the commercials for big screen movies and television shows, which of the commercials shown during the big game were directed by movie directors? Find out after the jump.

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Skyfall was a smash, and naturally EON Productions, MGM and Sony want to get a new James Bond film rolling with all due speed. All the companies involved want to get their money’s worth out of Daniel Craig while they’ve got him. The Bond machine doesn’t move quickly, however, and it’s no easy task to choose the path for the new installment of a franchise that is 50 years old and almost two dozen films along.

Since Sam Mendes won’t return to make the 24th Bond film (title TBD) who might do the job? EON is talking to a variety of people now, and some of the names are being reported. Ang Lee, Tom Hooper, David Yates, Nicolas Winding Refn, and Shane Black are all “in the mix” as possible directors. That doesn’t mean that any of them will be the person who next brings Bond to life, but it gives us something to think about.

Update: Everyone may have spoken too soon. Deadline reports that Sam Mendes is in talks to return to direct Bond 24. More below.

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With his first two features, Oscar-winning director Tom Hooper has shown a penchant towards historical dramatizations and music. Those films, of course, are The King’s Speech and Les Miserables. His third film might be a mix of the two, and the true story of a legendary musician. Hooper is currently circling the Freddie Mercury biopic with Sacha Baron Cohen attached to star. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Nominations for the Oscars will be announced later this week (on Thursday morning, to be precise) but for now we’ve got the five names nominated by the Director’s Guild of America for achievement in directing in 2012. The list features one newcomer to the DGA award slate, and four directors who have won in prior years.

In short, the names on the list are: Ben Affleck, Kathryn Bigelow, Tom Hooper, Ang Lee and Steven Spielberg. Everyone will likely have something to say about their favorite director who didn’t get the DGA nod this year, whether it is Quentin Tarantino, David O. Russell, or Paul Thomas Anderson.

Awards will be given out at the 65th Annual DGA Awards Dinner on Saturday, February 2, 2013. The full list of nominee info is below. Read More »

I was delighted to finally have the chance to catch Tom Hooper’s Les Misérables last night and despite a few significant missteps (e.g. Russell Crowe as Javert), I found it totally brilliant and engrossing. Nonetheless, I’ve been reading a bunch of criticism on the internet about Hooper’s directorial decisions, most pointedly regarding the look and sound of the film.

In Anthony Lane’s slam of the film in the New Yorker, Lane writes, “The actors were recorded live as they belted out the big numbers, and Hathaway, in particular, takes full advantage, turning in precisely the sort of performance, down to the last sniff, that she would be the first to lampoon on ‘Saturday Night Live.'” Over at The Atlantic, Christopher Orr writes, “The second or third time we watch a face fill the screen with notes tender or tragic, the effect is genuinely arresting. The 22nd or 23rd time…” Critics all over are having a ball blasting the unconventional directorial decisions made in the film. As someone who loved the movie, I thought I’d take a moment to reflect on some of these decisions.
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There’s a moment about 30 minutes into Tom Hooper‘s musical adaptation of Les Miserables where you’re either with it or not. Anne Hathaway, beaten and bruised, hair raggedly cropped short, sings the iconic song “I Dreamed a Dream.” She does so on her own, in a single long-take close-up that lasts at least three minutes. It’s Hooper’s way of telling the audience this film is going to be dark, it’s going to be dirty, it’s going to have emotions, and yes, it’s going to be these actors (who we know better as Wolverines, Catwomen, Gladiators or Mean Girls) singing — and only singing — their hearts out for almost three hours.

In this moment, Hathaway provides one of the most stirring and impressive emotional moments of 2012, perfect capturing the tone and wonder of Les Miserables. It’s mesmerizing, moving and magical. Read More »