‘Child of God’ Trailer: Hobo With a Shotgun

Child of God

2013 was a big year for James Franco. Not only did he star in a whole bunch of things, from Spring Breakers to Oz the Great and Powerful to This Is the End to ABC’s The Mindy Project, he also hit the film festival circuit with three separate films that he’d directed. Two of them, Interior. Leather Bar. and As I Lay Dying, have already received limited theatrical releases, but the third, Child of God, is still on its way.

Based on the novel by Cormac McCarthy, the crime drama stars Scott Haze as an outcast who retreats from society, and becomes progressively more disturbed and degraded. The first teaser hit back in August, and now a full-length trailer has finally arrived. Tim Blake Nelson, Jim Parrack, and James Franco also star. Check it out after the jump.

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Blue Caprice

Eleven years after the Beltway sniper attacks in 2002, first-time feature director Alexandre Moors revisits the horrific episode from the perspective of the killers in Blue Caprice. The haunting indie drama drew raves at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, and now it’s headed for a theatrical and VOD release next month. Watch the first trailer after the jump.

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as-i-lay-dying-james-franco

I’ll say this for James Franco‘s new outing as a director, and his highest-profile directorial gig to date: it takes some balls to tackle William Faulkner. The source material here is Faulkner’s seventh novel As I Lay Dying, which charts a family’s attempt to transport the body of its late matriarch to her preferred burial place, miles away. To grossly reduce things to a simple statement, the journey does not go well.

The film will premiere shortly at Cannes, and this trailer showcases the use of some of Faulkner’s original text in the script for the film. We get some idea of how Franco and the rest of the cast do with the material, but it’s too early to tell if the movie works. The novel is narrated by over a dozen characters, but we also don’t know how Franco, who also scripted, has dealt with the presentation of the story.

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Continuing a tradition that started with last year’s surprise unveiling of the then-unfinished Hugo, the New York Film Festival this week revealed a first look at a work-in-progress cut of Steven Spielberg‘s Lincoln.

Though we’ve seen little of the film so far, aside from a couple of trailers, the subject matter and the talent involved have marked it from early on as a potential Oscar contender. Based on the version I saw Monday night, that buzz is well-earned — it’s tough to imagine this film coming out the other end of awards season without at least a couple of little gold men. On the other hand, Spielberg falters by letting the Sixteenth President remain more myth than man, and the resulting film is a polished period piece that only occasionally feels truly vital.

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With his Cormac McCarthy adaptation Child of God in post-production, multi-hyphenate James Franco is prepping another literary classic for his next feature. Two winters ago, he was trying to get the William Faulkner estate on board for a movie version of As I Lay Dying. It seems he was successful, as the film’s now begun casting for a fall start. As of this week, Danny McBride, Tim Blake Nelson, Logan Marshall-Green (Prometheus), Jim Parrack (True Blood), and Ahna O’Reilly (The Help) are all lined up to star alongside Franco himself. More details after the jump.

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The Best WWII Movies You Probably Haven’t Seen

This friday Agnieszka Holland’s In Darkness opens in New York and Los Angeles. It ought to have a decent run at art houses in select cities after that, particularly if it wins the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film this year. (If anything is poised to upset A Separation, it’s this one.)

In In Darkness, Holland, director of Europa, Europa and a few key episodes of The Wire, tells a fascinating true story of a group of Polish Jews who survived for over one year in a city’s sewer system. In the press notes she commented that, just when we thought we’d heard all the World War II stories, she discovered this one. It got me thinking that, yes, not only are there a number of great World War II stories out there that haven’t been told, there are already so many that deserve to be rediscovered by a new audience.

So, with that, let’s set the way-back machine to the madness of mid-century and check out some tremendous art that grew from tragedy.

More Movies You Probably Havent Seen:

The Grey Zone (2001); Tim Blake Nelson, director

We’ll kick this one off with one of the most depressing and difficult to watch movies I’ve ever seen.

For those that felt Schindler’s List candy-coated the horrors of the Nazi extermination camps, I offer The Grey Zone. No narrative film has more directly detailed the functions and living conditions at Auschwitz as Tim Blake Nelson’s story of a rebellious group of Sonderkommando. The Sonderkommando, if you don’t know, were the groups of healthy, young Jews who were kept alive and forced to aid the the machinery of death at the camp. Yeah, pretty bleak stuff.

The story of this impossible revolt (and there were others – check out Jean-Francois Steiner’s book Treblinka for a similar tale) is a fascinating portrait of bravery in the face of insurmountable odds and absolute evil.

Hope and Glory (1987); John Boorman, director

Okay, we need to lighten up a little bit, and quick.

Hope and Glory is told from the point of view of a ten year old boy who, despite a vague understanding of distant suffering, thinks World War II is the greatest thing that ever happened to him. School is constantly cancelled, the London blitz offers new destroyed houses to stomp around in and he gets to spend some nights sleeping in the subway station.

It’s hard to make the war seem fun without being flip but Boorman’s quasi-autobiographical tale does the trick. It features a wide and wonderful cast of characters, the full tapestry of British society that held that country together. Among my favorites, the men rejected by the fighting army but relegated to the secretarial pool, puffing their chests and reminding themselves that “we’re typing for England!”

The Best Years of Our Lives (1946); William Wyler, director

After the bullets fly and the flags are planted, the war still rages within the minds of the men who fought it.

Best Picture winner The Best Years of Our Lives was one of the first American films that showed the psychological damage done not only on the battlefield, but on the homefront as well.

Three men of different social classes meet after the war on their way back to a fictional midwestern city. Each finds it difficult to reintegrate into their previous lives. There’s drinking, flashbacks, marital regret, love affairs and adjustments to physical handicaps. The Best Years of Our Lives is basically soap opera, but it is striking to see such issues framed in the conventions of 1940s cinema.

The Best Years of Our Lives won a whole slew of awards, including a Best Supporting nod for “non-actor” Harold Russell, a war veteran who lost both of his hands. Don’t judge this movie too harshly by the clip shown above (one of the few I could find.) Once you get into it, it really is quite good.

Stalingrad (1993); Joseph Vilsmaier, director

Okay, back to the action.

It was Wolfgang Peterson’s 1981 masterpiece Das Boot that made it “okay” to root for Germans in a World War II film provided that a) we were on the side of simple soldiers caught up in the larger machinations of war and b) lots of Germans died. Stalingrad takes this formula and runs it head-on into the ice cold hell that was the Battle of Stalingrad.

Joseph Vilsmaier’s epic features sieges, tank battles, the horrors of penal colonies, assaults on civilians, survivalism and an examination of loyalty versus common sense. There were 260,000 men in Germany’s 6th Army who went to Stalingrad. 6000 returned.

Continue Reading The Best WWII Movies You Probably Haven’t Seen

James Franco has been very keen on adapting a Cormac McCarthy novel to film. It was going to be Blood Meridian, and Franco in fact shot some test footage (with Mark Pellegrino, Scott Glenn, Dave Franco and Luke Perry) in 2010 to prove to producer Scott Rudin that he had the goods to make the movie. But Franco and Rudin fell out, and so Franco is one of several directors who have tried and failed to bring the challenging Blood Meridian to the screen.

Franco is evidently undaunted on the McCarthy front, however, as he is now reportedly at work on a film version of the author’s third novel Child of God. This one is a bit less challenging than Blood Meridian, but no less intense and, potentially, controversial. Read More »

Tony Kaye got a reputation for being hard-headed during the production of American History X, and though he released the incendiary abortion documentary Lake of Fire in 2006, the years since American History X haven’t been easy for the director when it comes to narrative films. His movie Black Water Transit has been on the shelf for years now, and Kaye seemed like he might be a permanent resident of director jail.

But his new film Detachment is finally getting a release. The film stars Adrien Brody as a substitute teacher who may have more problems than his studens do. The supporting cast is big: Marcia Gay Harden, Christina Hendricks, William Petersen, Bryan Cranston, Tim Blake Nelson, Lucy Liu, Blythe Danner, and James Caan, and Brody’s work seems like it might even be as good as the bold pullquotes that decorate the new trailer would suggest. Check out the trailer below and see for yourself. Read More »

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