The Sound and the Fury trailer

James Franco is known as an Oscar-nominated movie star, a terrible Oscar co-host, a model, an artist, an author, and a general all-around weirdo, but he’s also a surprisingly prolific director. And his latest film, The Sound and the Fury, has just unveiled its first trailer.

Based on the classic novel by William FaulknerThe Sound and the Fury chronicles the decline of the once-proud Compson family over three decades in Jefferson, Mississippi. Franco himself plays Benjy, the disabled Compson son, and Seth RogenDanny McBrideScott HazeTim Blake Nelson, Loretta Devine, Joey King, and Ahna O’Reilly also star. (Yes, this is a Franco / Rogen / McBride movie that is a straight-up serious drama.) Watch The Sound and the Fury trailer after the jump. Read More »


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Amazon 2015 pilots

Since the fall season has traditionally been when networks debut their biggest new series for the year, Amazon Studios has consistently followed suit by revealing a batch of new pilots, and their slate for the 2015-2016 television season has just been unveiled.

The Amazon 2015 pilots include hopeful new shows from the likes of Shane Black (director Iron Man 3, Kiss Kiss Bang Bang), Sacha Baron Cohen (writer and star Borat), Tim Blake Nelson (director of Leaves of Grass and O) and starring talents such as Christina Ricci, Tig Notaro, Terry O’Quinn and more. And as usual, it will be Amazon customers who will watch and provide feedback on these shows to help determine which ones get a full series order.

Get much more details descriptions of the new Amazon 2015 pilots after the jump! Read More »

Fantastic Four banner header

With just weeks to go until its release date, Fantastic Four is squeezing in one last trailer to get you pumped for the newest incarnation of Marvel’s oldest superhero team. Miles Teller, Kate Mara, Michael B. Jordan, and Jamie Bell star as four smart and attractive young people who travel into an alternate dimension and return with bizarre powers.

Also starring are Reg E. Cathey as Johnny and Sue’s dad Franklin Storm, Toby Kebbell as the villainous Doctor Doom, and Tim Blake Nelson as Harvey Elder (a.k.a. the future Mole Man). Josh Trank directed. Watch the Fantastic Four final trailer after the jump. Read More »

James Franco Child of God

James Franco pays the bills (and has a great time) in big movies, and in friend projects such as This Is the End and The Interview. On the side, he has become a prolific art house director. His latest directorial effort to hit theaters is a really something to behold. Based on the Cormac McCarthy novel Child of God, this latest film from Franco is a tightly-crafted and very effective story of a wildly unstable man.

Child of God is pure, undiluted McCarthy. Anyone who has hoped to see the core of a novel like Blood Meridian translated to the screen should see this one. If nothing else, it makes clear why putting hardcore McCarthy concepts into a mainstream movie is particularly difficult. Child of God is grimy, ugly, and odd. The lead, Scott Haze (above), gives one of the most raw, rub-till-it-bleeds performances I’ve seen in a long time. His work is chilling. (Tim Blake Nelson and Jim Parrack also co-star, and Franco appears in a brief role.) Check out the latest trailer below. Read More »

Tim Blake Nelson Fantastic Four

Josh Trank‘s Fantastic Four already has a central quartet and a badass villain. But now it’s getting around to casting some other key characters. Tim Blake Nelson has just joined the superhero saga as Harvey Elder, known in the comics as the Mole Man. Hit the jump for more on what he’ll be doing in the franchise.

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‘Child of God’ Trailer: Hobo With a Shotgun

Child of God

2013 was a big year for James Franco. Not only did he star in a whole bunch of things, from Spring Breakers to Oz the Great and Powerful to This Is the End to ABC’s The Mindy Project, he also hit the film festival circuit with three separate films that he’d directed. Two of them, Interior. Leather Bar. and As I Lay Dying, have already received limited theatrical releases, but the third, Child of God, is still on its way.

Based on the novel by Cormac McCarthy, the crime drama stars Scott Haze as an outcast who retreats from society, and becomes progressively more disturbed and degraded. The first teaser hit back in August, and now a full-length trailer has finally arrived. Tim Blake Nelson, Jim Parrack, and James Franco also star. Check it out after the jump.

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Blue Caprice

Eleven years after the Beltway sniper attacks in 2002, first-time feature director Alexandre Moors revisits the horrific episode from the perspective of the killers in Blue Caprice. The haunting indie drama drew raves at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, and now it’s headed for a theatrical and VOD release next month. Watch the first trailer after the jump.

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I’ll say this for James Franco‘s new outing as a director, and his highest-profile directorial gig to date: it takes some balls to tackle William Faulkner. The source material here is Faulkner’s seventh novel As I Lay Dying, which charts a family’s attempt to transport the body of its late matriarch to her preferred burial place, miles away. To grossly reduce things to a simple statement, the journey does not go well.

The film will premiere shortly at Cannes, and this trailer showcases the use of some of Faulkner’s original text in the script for the film. We get some idea of how Franco and the rest of the cast do with the material, but it’s too early to tell if the movie works. The novel is narrated by over a dozen characters, but we also don’t know how Franco, who also scripted, has dealt with the presentation of the story.

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Continuing a tradition that started with last year’s surprise unveiling of the then-unfinished Hugo, the New York Film Festival this week revealed a first look at a work-in-progress cut of Steven Spielberg‘s Lincoln.

Though we’ve seen little of the film so far, aside from a couple of trailers, the subject matter and the talent involved have marked it from early on as a potential Oscar contender. Based on the version I saw Monday night, that buzz is well-earned — it’s tough to imagine this film coming out the other end of awards season without at least a couple of little gold men. On the other hand, Spielberg falters by letting the Sixteenth President remain more myth than man, and the resulting film is a polished period piece that only occasionally feels truly vital.

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