Even his brief stint in rehab doesn’t seem to have slowed down Gerard Butler much at all. With Movie 43, Playing the Field, and Of Men and Mavericks all due out this year, and Hunter Killer, Thunder Run, Brilliant, and How to Train Your Dragon 2 already on his upcoming slate, the Scottish star has booked yet another role. Described as “Die Hard in the White House,” Olympus Has Fallen will see Butler starring as an ex-Secret Service agent who’s called upon to serve his country once more when terrorists take over 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Butler is also set to produce the action thriller from newbie writers Creighton Rothenberger and Katrin Benedikt, which is set up at Millennium. No director has been announced at this time, but with production scheduled for a September start we expect we’ll hear some news on that front soon. [THR]

After the jump, Phil Dunphy replaces Tony Stark, and that Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close kid gets two more jobs.

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The first trailer for Stephen Daldry‘s adaptation of Jonathan Safran Foer‘s novel Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close tried to live in the area between quirky, endearing and sentimental. The balance didn’t work for me, especially thanks to the reliance on U2 as the score for the trailer. As a result I think that first look at the movie pegged it as little more than cloying Oscar bait.

Now there is a new trailer that goes straight for the sentiment by opening with the character played by Tom Hanks calling his wife, played by Sandra Bullock, from one of the high floors of the World Trade Center on the morning of 9/11. From there, the trailer swirls into minor portraits of some of the film’s characters and situations as it follows that couple’s son (newcomer Thomas Horn) through the turbulent days that follow 9/11, but there still isn’t much explanation of the story. See for yourself below. Read More »

‘Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close’ Trailer

Here’s the trailer for Stephen Daldry‘s adaptation of Jonathan Safran Foer‘s novel Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, based on a script by Eric Roth. The movie has been a curiosity for me for months in part because the book is a piece of post-modernism that doesn’t lend itself easily to adaptation, and in part because Daldry chose a non-actor, Thomas Horn, to play the central role of 11-year old Oskar Schell. Sure, he’s got established stars like Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock as buffers, but that’s still a ballsy move. Get the first taste of what came of that big risk-taking, after the break. Read More »

Warner Bros. evidently has high hopes for Stephen Daldry‘s adaptation of the Jonathan Safran Foer novel Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close, as the studio recently set the film for a December 25 debut. Indeed, the novel, which is a quirky but heartfelt account of a young boy’s attempt to uncover some family history in the wake of 9/11, could easily be the basis for a moving holiday film.

I’m anxious to see a trailer, in part because the key role in the film — the boy Oskar — went to a non-actor: young Jeopardy! winner Thomas Horn. The potential that this film will reveal a new young talent seems high, much as True Grit did last year with Hailee Steinfeld. While we wait for that trailer, check out the first official image from the film, which shows Horn with Tom Hanks, as Oskar’s father. Read More »

If you’re a Jeopardy! fiend, the name Thomas Horn is likely familiar; to everyone else some explanation is in order as to how the 12-year old earned his fame, and how that has led to him landing a plum role in Stephen Daldry‘s adaptation of the Jonathan Safran Foer novel Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.

Thomas Horn won $31,800 on the game show in October, and he’s obviously got some smart people working for him, too. Deadline says he’s now earned the role of Oskar Schell, the smart young artist/inventor/writer who sets off on an unusual journey of discovery when he discovers a key among the possessions of his late father, who was killed in 9/11. Read More »

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