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It’s a crazy, mixed up world and we are thankful for movies that offer proof. Slashfilm’s Weekend Weirdness examines such flicks, whether in the form of a premiere for a provocative indie, a mini review, or…the Boosh!

“We were going to do [a tour of America],” Noel Fielding admitted to an enthused, sold-out crowd last weekend at the 92Y Tribeca in NYC. “But then my hat caught fire.” Fielding’s voice during the last bit softened into the feigned shyness typified by the London hipsters and rockstars The Mighty Boosh has expertly razzed through the aughts onward.

There was a waft of irony to their appearance in the city, since fans had come to the venue, not to see The Boosh perform, but to watch a new doc entitled Journey of the Childmen about their 2008/2009 tour in the UK. Tickets for two exclusive screenings actually sold out before it was announced online that The Boosh would be attending. Their presence resulted in a unique pop culture snapshot; here was a dedicated fanbase and two of the most original British comedians working today, all parties aware of the gap in mainstream crossover awareness outside the screening room. And in minutes, the former would be watching the latter perform to a 12,000 person arena many miles away.

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Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

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Here’s to a school of dagger-propelled, orange barracuda siccing any listmeister who jumped the gun and failed to consider A Town Called Panic for his or her top ten films of 2009. Undeniably the most entertaining and energetic movie of that now-caput year, I found myself funstruck from film’s start to its fireworks-laden finish; ATCP is also 2009′s best animated film, somehow scurrying and climbing past other visionary, grand entries from the oh-nine like Wes Anderson’s fireside-classic Fantastic Mr. Fox, Pixar’s latest crown jewel Up, and Disney’s strong, under-appreciated The Princess and the Frog. This superlative—and I realize how questionable it may seem to those unimpressed by the accompanying image—is not fueled by contrarianism or ostentatious indie preferences; this Fantastic Fest Audience Award winner is simply that effing good. Seek it out.

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Movie Trailer: Bunny and the Bull

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While we were previously privy to a clip from Paul King‘s Bunny and the Bull, the full trailer for the film has now been launched, and you can see it embedded below the break. This is the first film from the director of The Mighty Boosh and features several alumni of that show in the cast, including hipster heartthrobs Julian Barratt and Noel Fielding. It also looks rather like an episode of The Boosh, which isn’t a bad thing.

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This Week in DVD & Blu-ray is a column that compiles all the latest info regarding new DVD and Blu-ray releases, sales, and exclusive deals from stores including Target, Best Buy and Fry’s.

Buy It

DRAG ME TO HELL
The only thing missing from this bit of glorious schlock-o-rama is 3D. So many gag-inducing substances are splattered in and around Alison Lohman‘s mouth, the central conflict of the film might as well be her trying to keep her face clean. This fiendish display of gore and grue, combined with an underlying sense of dark, campy comedy that’s carefully balanced against the film’s otherwise serious tone, is not something that’s likely to appeal to all horror buffs. Those looking for an original storyline and unique characters are going to walk away unimpressed. However, as I’m sure any other Evil Dead fan will also tell you, Sam Raimi‘s horror expertise extends less to the general plot of his films and more to his enthusiasm and creativity with all of the scenes in between. When a girl is being haunted in your typical horror film, it’s generally a matter of going through the motions, showing us the same damn thing we’ve seen time and time again while we anxiously wait for something exciting to happen—often to no avail. In a Sam Raimi film though, you better believe that girl is going to get the shit kicked out of her, and as her frail body flies across the room, you won’t know whether to laugh or cringe. You’d think the PG-13 rating would’ve forced Raimi to show some restraint, but the ensuing torment is presented with such relentless ferocity—always playing on just the right visual/aural buttons—he manages to leave other R-rated horror films in his dust. Without a doubt, Drag Me to Hell is one of my favorite movies of the year, and sits right alongside Trick ‘r Treat as one of the best two horror films of ’09.
Blu-ray? Yes.
Notable Extras: DVD & Blu-ray – Includes both unrated director’s cut and theatrical versions of the film and production video diaries.

BEST DVD PRICE
Target Best Buy Fry’s
$16.99 $17.99 $15.77
Amazon – $16.99

BEST BLU-RAY PRICE
Target Best Buy Fry’s
$24.99 $26.99 $25.77
Amazon – $24.99

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This Week in DVD & Blu-ray is a column that compiles all the latest info regarding new DVD and Blu-ray releases, sales, and exclusive deals from stores including Target, Best Buy and Fry’s.

Please don’t take the commentary on the movies and TV shows too seriously, as they’re meant not to be reviews but rather previews that include the general thoughts and ramblings of a twice-committed DVD addict. The categories represent solely the author’s intentions towards the films at hand, and are in no way meant to be a reflection on what he thinks other people should rent or buy. So if he ends up putting a movie you like in the “Skip it” section without having seen it, please keep in mind that the time you could spend leaving a spiteful but ultimately futile comment could instead be used for more pleasant things in life. Like buying DVDs.

Buy It

WATCHMEN
(Available as single-disc Theatrical Cut and 2-Disc Director’s Cut)
For the longest time the Watchmen graphic novel was said to be “unfilmable”. Obviously, that’s a nonsensical notion. If we’ve learned anything from the Super Mario Bros. movie, it’s that any property can be adapted into a film, regardless of story (or lack thereof). The real question is whether or not it can be done well. And in the case of Watchmen, director Zack Synder found himself in a lose-lose situation. The problem with adapting any comic or novel for the big screen is that, more often than not, what worked in its original medium just doesn’t translate that well to film. Thus, the only solution is to make concessions by changing various aspects of the source material. In many instances, this process has yielded positive results (V for Vendetta, the latest Harry Potter films), regardless of what the frothing hostility of certain fanboys might suggest. Watchmen though, would only suffer from these types of changes. To significantly alter the source material would be to defeat the purpose of adapting it at all. Zack Snyder was clearly aware of this, and decided (with one notable exception) to remain as faithful to Alan Moore‘s classic graphic novel as possible. While I strongly believe Snyder made the right choice, there’s no denying that the resulting film suffers from all the expected flaws that come with going down this route. The pacing is all over the place, certain twists and turns don’t carry the same weight as they do in the graphic novel, and uninitiated viewers may find themselves at a total loss as to what in the hell they’re watching. Simply put: As a movie meant to stand on its own, Watchmen is a failure. It succeeds, however, as a fascinating experiment and companion piece for those who have already read and loved the graphic novel. Likely not what the studio was hoping for, admittedly, but for people like me, it’s just about the best Watchmen film we could’ve asked for… even if, frankly, it probably shouldn’t have been made in the first place.
Blu-ray? Yes.
Notable Extras: DVD – Single-disc includes the theatrical cut of the film. 2-Disc includes the director’s cut with 25 minutes of additional footage, a “The Phenomenon: The Comic that Changed Comics” featurette, 30 minutes of Video Journals, a My Chemical Romance Desolation Row music video, and a digital copy of the theatrical version. Blu-ray – Includes all of the 2-Disc DVD extras, along with 2 additional featurettes (“Real Super Heroes, Real Vigilantes”, “Mechanics: Technologies of a Fantastic World”), 30 minutes of Watchmen Focus Points, and a Warner Bros. Maximum Movie Mode.
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One of the best BBC sitcoms of recent years is The Mighty Boosh, created by and starring Julian Barratt and Noel Fielding and directed by Paul King. Originating as a stage show – essentially stand up comedy with theatrical elaborations – then undergoing a typical Britcom rite of passage on radio, Boosh became an instant TV cult with it’s first airing in 2004. I reckon the show has notably improved not just once but twice with the advent of each subsequent season. I like shows that keep getting better and wish there were more of them.

Boosh is effectively a flat share comedy (though that flat has also been a zoo, dessert island or magic shop as well as a flat) which takes determinedly off the wall dives into pop surrealism. It’s effortlessly the hippest show on the BBC. For the last year now a feature film version of the show has been in development, which seems to mean Fielding and Barratt have been writing away while Paul King has been shooting his debut feature, the Boosh-less Bunny & The Bull. More on that beyond the break – as well as a video with some of the Boosh boys talking about their desired casting for the big screen episode.

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