There have been a great many new posters in the past few days. Just this afternoon we’ve seen new one-sheets for the doc Page One: Inside the New York Times, the horror remake Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark, Miranda July‘s odd-sounding new drama The Future, and Lars Von Trier‘s Melancholia. Plus earlier this week there were new sheets for tantalizing Cannes debut Sleeping Beauty, The Art of Getting By, What’s Your Number?, The Ledge, The Beaver and Troll Hunter. They’re all after the break, along with info on each film and links to the trailers. Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

Sundance entry The Ledge, in which Terrence Howard plays a detective who is trying to talk Charlie Hunnam out of killing himself, has always seemed like one of those movies.  A known but not terribly high-powered cast; a big setup; and a story that seems to uncomfortably weave a discussion about religion into the narrative. A movie about Issues, in other words, disguised none too cleverly as a thriller. (And it isn’t Man on a Ledge; that’s a different film with Sam Worthington.) Now that there is a trailer for the IFC release, it seems even more so. Check it out after the break, but be ready to see Patrick Wilson‘s righteous religious fury stir up some trouble. Read More »

Sundance Invades The Summer of 2011

Everyone’s talked ad nauseam about how the summer of 2011 is going to be a blockbuster bloodbath. Week after week of high concept, big budget sequels featuring superheroes, robots and wizards. But those aren’t the only movies that’ll be playing at your local theater during the long, hot months of May, June, July and August. A huge chunk of movies we reviewed in January at the Sundance Film Festival – from award winners to our personal favorites – are also finding their way into theaters during that time. As the heat quickly approaches, we’ve decided to highlight over 20 Sundance films that are scheduled to open opposite the traditional Hollywood fare. See images, read reviews and find release dates all below. Read More »

The last couple years at festivals have seen a lot of hand-wringing and commentary about how sales were slow. But Sundance 2011 seems to be a lively marketplace, with big films quickly snapped up by distributors. (Even if they’re mostly films with great press or known casts that are easily marketed.) The big news has been Kevin Smith‘s self-distro plan for Red State, while Margin Call and Like Crazy found early buyers. Several more big sales have been made since then.

After the break, a rundown of sales over the last twelve hours, which includes sales for early festival fave Martha Marcy May Marlene and the comedy My Idiot Brother. Read More »

Does someone have a case of the Mondays? We understand. Going back to work sucks but while you probably had the weekend off, Slashfilm hasn’t stopped working. If you can call watching movies non-stop working.

Myself, Peter Sciretta and David Chen have been all over Park City Utah at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival which continues through next Sunday. We’ve reviewed over a dozen movies, quested for tickets, done video blogs and much more. Did you miss any of the coverage? No worries. We’ve created this convenient rundown of everything we’d published so far including reviews of the recently acquired films Project Nim and Margin Call, hidden gems like Win Win and Bellflower and, of course, all the Red State coverage you can handle.

Later today, be on the look out for reviews of My Idiot Brother, Like Crazy, The Greatest Movie Ever Sold and more. But until then, see the roundup of all our coverage below:

Thursday January 20

Why do we come to the Sundance Film Festival? We explain it’s allure.

We have arrived at Sundance, and here’s what we are most excited for. Video Blog.

Friday January 21

Getting tickets to Red State was quite the ordeal.

The opening night film was James Marsh’s Project Nim. Here’s our review.

Ever see a horror movie all done in one shot? It’s called Silent House and here’s a review.

Margin Call stars Kevin Spacey, Jeremy Irons, Stanley Tucci and was reviewed here.

Saturday January 22

Bloody revenge came to Sundance in the way if I Saw The Devil. Our review is here.

It’s got big stars like Liv Tyler and Patrick Wilson but does The Ledge deliver big? Find out here.

Around here we call it the Four M’s or MMMM. The real title is Martha Marcy May Marlene and it’s supposed to be amazing.

A mini-review roundup featuring The Future by Miranda July and Bobby Fischer Against the World.

Sunday January 23

Peter loved it at Toronto and a whole bunch of people, including David, loved it at Sundance. It’s a Submarine Video Blog!

Between movies, David was walking around Park City talking to movie fans. Here’s what they had to say.

My favorite film of the festival so far is Tom McCarthy’s Win Win with Paul Giamatti and Amy Ryan. Amazing movie.

Peter generated controversy by calling Bellflower “500 Days of Summer for the Jackass Hipster Generation,” read exactly what he meant.

Red State

Right after the movie ended, here’s what we all thought about Red State.

Kevin Smith made some major, big time, groundbreaking revelations about his film and its distribution. Read them here.

Here’s my full review of Red State and probably not the last.

Upon first reading about The Ledge, it felt like one of those classic Sundance Film Festival movies that could breakout and be a hit. It has a well-known cast, an experienced writer/director and a story that’s easily digestible. The story is about how and why a man on the ledge of a building is ready to kill himself, the cast includes Charlie Hunnam, Liv Tyler, Patrick Wilson and Terrence Howard and the writer/director is Matthew Chapman, who wrote Runaway Jury, Color of Night and Consenting Adults.

And while The Ledge is filled with interesting characters, solid performances and even some smart, thought-provoking dialogue, the story itself wanders around like leaf in the wind, at times totally unaware of the driving force of the movie: the Ledge of the title. Read more after the jump. Read More »

The announcement of the movies playing the 2011 Sundance Film Festival is like looking into our film futures. It’s December and most movie fans are looking back at the last 12 months, picking out award winners, writing top ten lists, and chances are we haven’t even heard of the Sundance films. They’re just titles, people, words on a computer screen. Then in January they unspool on screens across Park City, Utah and become something more. Finally, months later, these are the movies we discuss with our friends and choose on ballots at awards parties. Yet we get to read about them now, a year in advance.

Last year at this time, who had heard of Four Lions, Catfish, Exit Through The Gift Shop, Blue Valentine, The Kids Are All Right, Winter’s Bone, Restrepo or Animal Kingdom? Sundance, that’s who. All those films screened at the 2010 festival and now many have become not only personal favorites, but critical darlings and award contenders too.

Wednesday, Sundance announced the 58 films eligible for awards in four categories that will play the 2011 festival, taking place January 20-30. The 57 out-of-competition films in six additional categories will be announced Thursday. After the jump, we’ll give you the full list as well as highlight five in each category that sound particular promising. Read More »

tyler-wilson-1

Liv Tyler and Patrick Wilson will feature in The Ledge, a “suspense thriller” (as opposed to non-suspenseful thrillers) that will mark the feature debut of writer/director Matthew Chapman.

Terrence Howard and Charlie Hunnam co-star in the film about “a man (Hunnam) standing on a high-rise ledge who insists he must jump by noon as the policeman below (Howard) tries to manage the situation.” OK, sounds like Hunnam and Howard are leading the cast, so who will Wilson and Tyler play? Good question. Producer Michael Mailer has a great quote about the production, at least: “As more and more films succumb to the visual wizardry of 3D, ‘The Ledge’ explores the fourth dimension: the interior life of tortured souls hovering over the precipice of emotional nullity. This film is the reason why I became an independent filmmaker and why I continue to suffer in the trenches of independent filmmaking.” Take that, 3D! [THR]

After the break, news on the brother of Thor and a new comedy for Chris Evans and Anna Faris. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web: