‘Game of Thrones’ Premieres April 17

Briefly: Earlier today we saw some trailers and info on the new HBO offerings Mildred Pierce and The Sunset Limited. Now there’s a premiere date for Game of Thrones, the adaptation of George R.R. Martin‘s novels with a pilot directed by Tom McCarthy (The Station Agent, The Visitor). The show will debut Sunday, April 17.

Though I wasn’t knocked out by the trailer for this one I’m still on the hook, not so much because of the source material (which I know is the key factor for a great many fans) but because I’m so curious to see what Tom McCarthy and his cast have done with an adult fantasy setting. David Benioff and Dan Weiss are the lead writers and producers, and the cast includes Sean Bean, Peter Dinklage, Iain Glen, Lena Headey, Richard Madden and Sophie Turner. [EW]

‘Black Death’ Red-Band Trailer and Poster

Christopher Smith (Severance, Triangle) has finished his film Black Death, in which Sean Bean plays a knight tasked with discovering the truth about a nearby village. Stories say that it is untouched by the black plague, and that it is led by a necromancer who can raise the dead. Eddie Redmayne is along for the ride, as a young monk meant to lead the knight to the storied village. But things don’t go quite as planned.

We’ve seen one international trailer for the film; now there’s a red-band version, which is after the break. Read More »

TV Trailer and Photo Gallery: ‘Game of Thrones’

The two teasers we’ve seen so far for the HBO series adaptation of George R.R. Martin‘s Game of Thrones showed very little. What we did see had the color bled out to fit the dour tone of each teaser, and while the brief images were tantalizing, there was no way to get a real sense of how the series might play. So this new trailer is the first finished footage we’ve seen to complement the colorful behind the scenes clips doled out sporadically over the past months. Check it out after the break. Read More »

Movie Trailer: ‘Death Race 2’


For those of you who always wondered how the death race in Death Race began, it seems that Death Race 2, which comes straight to DVD and Blu-ray on January 18, will hold the answers you desire. From director Roel Reiné, the film stars Sean Bean, Ving Rhames, Danny Trejo and others. Besides the fact that it doesn’t have Jason Statham or Joan Allen in it, this sequel – even though it’s direct to video – looks right in line with the action, budget and effects of the first film. If you were a fan, check it out after the jump along with a plot synopsis and cover art. Read More »


Please Recommend /Film on Facebook


When Christopher Smith‘s movie Black Death was announced, I was interested simply for the fact that Smith was making a film set in the dark ages starring Sean Bean. I’d liked Smith’s first film Creep and loved his follow-up, Severance. And now, after recently seeing his excellent third film, Triangle, I’m more interested than ever. Now there’s a trailer for Black Death that shows off just what he’s trying to achieve this time out. Read More »


Tracy Morgan is set to take a turn in a police drama called Son of No One, in which he’ll play a role originally set for Terrence Howard. Co-stars are Katie Holmes (continuing her comeback streak), Juliette Binoche and Channing Tatum, with Ray Liotta and Al Pacino. Dito Montiel directs.

Channing is the lead character, “a young cop assigned to a precinct in the working class neighborhood where he grew up, with an old secret surfacing and threatening to destroy his life and family.” Morgan will play a friend of Channing’s character. This could be a good move for the actor; I’d love to see Morgan break away from his increasingly predictable comic persona to show some dramatic chops. [THR]

After the break, Sean Bean and Danny Dyer join a sorta-Ian Fleming biopic and Kate Hudson joins a romance. Read More »


I’ve had people tell me to read George R.R. Martin‘s fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire for years, but I’ve never been terribly interested. I’m much more taken with the idea of HBO’s television production Game of Thrones, based on the first book in the series, primarily because of the talent involved. (That’s the first still from the pilot, above.) Now with the pilot completed, HBO has greenlit a first season for the show. Read More »


Against all laws of nature, Big Momma’s House 3 keeps happening, though it probably won’t be called that. Martin Lawrence is going to go back into rubbery drag for the third outing, and he’ll be joined by Brandon T. Jackson of Tropic Thunder and Percy Jackson. Guess everyone’s gotta eat, but why does it have to be a shit sandwich?

This one will see “FBI agent Malcolm Turner (Lawrence) and his 17-year-old nephew, Trent (Jackson), go undercover at an all-girls performing arts school after Trent witnesses a murder. Posing as Big Momma and Charmaine, they must find the murderer before he finds them.” The f ilm shoots in Atlanta soon; if I’m out for drinks sometime in the next month and come across the casts and crews of this and Hall Pass fighting in the streets, Anchorman style, I’ll be so happy. [Variety]

After the break, Sean Bean has his work cut out for him, and Elizabeth Banks may have a cool new project. Read More »


You might remember that, last May, Trainspotting author Irvine Welsh was announced as the director of The Magnificent Eleven, a modern remake of The Magnificent Seven that centers around a group of UK footballers (i.e. soccer players, which I pray doesn’t really require explanation) who rally around a Tandoori restaurant. We still don’t know that much about the picture, but at last there are some actors to associate with it: Sean Bean, Dougray Scott and Robert Vaughn have all been cast. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:


Our stateside readers who dig serial killer procedural-thrillers in the vein of Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs should make a blood-scrawled note of Britain’s Red Riding Trilogy. This Friday, the epic triptych begins a one week run at IFC Center in New York City, complete with two intermissions and a free popcorn (caution to the hemoglobin phobes, the elderly, and flatulent ). I recently attended all three entries, titled 1974, 1980, and 1983, and definitely recommend the five-hour experience, both for the project’s interconnected, serpentine plotting and to contrast the clear stylistic and tonal differences between the three directors.

Below is an exclusive Slashfilm clip from 1974, which I felt in my review is the superior entry thanks to the charged noir vision of director Julian Jarrold (Brideshead Revisited) and a star-making performance by Andrew Garfield, as a young journo submerged in idealism, booze, and mutton-chopped pheromones. Garfield’s conveyed arrogant dissonance seethes through in this excerpted scene, and the actor is set for a high profile 2010 with upcoming roles in David Fincher‘s Facebook drama The Social Network and Mark Romanek‘s mysterious Never Let Me Go. He also participated in Spike Jonze’s short film and /fave, I’m Here

[flv:http://media2.slashfilm.com/slashfilm/trailers/redriding1974.flv 550 366]

Without spoiling the film, here’s context for the above scene: Garfield’s character, Eddie Dunford, hungry for his big break and his mum’s approval, is researching and investigating the fresh case of a missing girl in Northern England. In the cig-smoke clouded office of his newspaper, Dunford’s equally clouded by older, world-weary cynics. In this particular scene, Dunford is adamant that the recent arrest of an alleged abductor is bullocks. At clip’s conclusion, he finds a suspicious card on his boss’s desk, evidently filled with warm-sentiments from a shady developer named John Dawson (the unseen Sean Bean in a sleazy role that rivals Garfield’s in arrogant machismo).

Dawson’s card is just further proof that the media is in bed with shady elites who are in bed with the cops—all the while nobody seems to give a shit that young girls—those eluded to in the trilogy’s title—are being picked off the street by a madman (men?). Yorkshire in the ’70s, evil was a fan. Also, note the presence in the scene of the always-good Eddie Marsan, who adds a wild-and-defeated-eyed unpredictability to the film(s)—a familiar gift to anyone who saw him in last year’s Happy-Go-Lucky.