Jamie Foxx in Django Unchained

It’s been a while since we’ve seen Will Smith in a great movie. You could argue we’ve never seen the actor in a great movie, but he did have the opportunity to be a part of one a few years ago. Smith passed on starring in Quentin Tarantino‘s Django Unchained. He missed out on a strong role, a role he didn’t feel was substantial enough. Smith, who’s on the Oscar hunt for Concussion, now claims he turned the part down for a different reason.

Learn why we didn’t see Will Smith in Django Unchained after the jump.

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the hateful eight ultra panavision

Much has been written about the the upcoming theatrical roll-out of The Hateful Eight. Before it opens in every multiplex in the world, Quentin Tarantino‘s western thriller will have a “roadshow” release, hitting select theaters around the country to screen in 70mm projection. This roadshow version, in addition to being Tarantino’s recommended way of seeing the film, will also have additional footage, including a musical overture and intermission.

In other words, it’s an old school way to screen a brand new movie.

Of course, some audiences may not be aware of what’s special about this kind of presentation, or why it’s such a big deal that The Hateful Eight was shot on 65mm film using Ultra Panavision lenses. That’s why this featurette exists. Even seasoned film buffs will get a kick out of watching Tarantino and his crew lose their minds over this glorious tech.

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quentin tarantino documentary

Quentin Tarantino wouldn’t be Quentin Tarantino if he wasn’t stirring up controversy everywhere he went. While his increasingly bizarre showdown with various police unions only provides additional free advertising for next movie, The Hateful Eight, another filmmaker is looking to take advantage of his incredible career and filmography. Production has begun on director Tara Wood‘s 21 Years: Quentin Tarantino, a documentary that will chart the first 21 years of Tarantino’s career .

You can find the necessary details about the Quentin Tarantino documentary after the jump.

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the hateful eight trailer

Look, we know you’re very excited for Star Wars, but if we were able to see one December 2015 release right here, right now, if would be Quentin Tarantino‘s The Hateful Eight. After the one-two punch of Inglourious Basterds and Django Unchained, Tarantino has only confirmed his status as one of the most unique and exciting filmmakers working today. Each of his movies is an experience.

The new trailer for The Hateful Eight only heightens our anticipation for this “drawing room mystery” western, which places eight violent people in one tiny room and watches them all turn on one another. This movie may take place almost entirely in one location, but as this preview shows us, there will be no shortage of gunplay.

You can watch the Hateful Eight trailer for yourself right after the

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NYPD Quentin Tarantino Boycott

Quentin Tarantino (The Hateful Eight) has been accused of glamorizing violence all throughout his career. Time and time again his depiction of violence is misread, almost with every one of his films. Apparently, in this respect, even the NYPD has a problem with the director’s work.

Read more after the jump.

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The Hateful Eight

Throughout the fall of film and the rise of digital, Quentin Tarantino (Inglourious Basterds) has firmly stuck with film. Tarantino has discussed his plans to retire at 60, but he’s even gone as far to say, if theaters can’t show 35mm anymore, he “won’t even make it to 60.” Tarantino shot his upcoming film, The Hateful Eight, on 70mm. To make sure people experience the film in all its beauty, not only will there be roadshow screenings of the western, there will also be two different versions of The Hateful Eight. Learn more after the jump.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Nicolas Cage in Left Behind

Nicolas Cage is a worker. Sometimes I wonder if him and Samuel L. Jackson have a bet on which one of them can appear in the most movies in a year. Of course there’s nothing wrong with liking to work. Sometimes working at that rate just means a filmography becomes more about quantity than quality, which has been the case with Cage’s career over the past few years. Don’t bother worrying about the actor, though, because Nicolas Cage has no regrets. The only regret might be never working with director Quentin Tarantino — but will a Nicolas Cage Quentin Tarantino collaboration ever happen?

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quentin tarantino netflix

Earlier this week we ran a trailer and information about a new book titled I Lost It At The Video Store. The book by Tom Roston features a compilation of interviews with filmmakers such as John Sayles, Quentin Tarantino, Kevin Smith, Darren Aronofsky, David O. Russell giving an oral history of the video store era of cinema history.

The Playlist published an excerpt from the book, but I wanted to highlight a few quotes from Pulp Fiction/Django Unchained filmmaker Quentin Tarantino and Requiem for a Dream/Noah director Darren Aronofsky talking about their relationships with streaming services like Netflix and the process of editing a film to be watched on an iPhone. Hit the jump to read the Quentin Tarantino Netflix comments and more.

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‘I Lost It At The Video Store’ Trailer

I Lost it at the Video Store trailer
I’m old. When I wanted to see a movie I used to visit a store to rent movies on a cassette tape. It sounds like an old archaic system, but the experience was rather magical. And while the quality wasn’t even standard definition, far below the 4K High Definition resolutions of today, it didn’t seem to matter. Don’t get me wrong, you’d have to pry my AppleTV from my cold dead hands — I love the instant availability and quality that the digital age affords us — but there was something magical about that video store.

Tom Roston has written a new book titled “I Lost It at the Video Store: A Filmmakers’ Oral History of a Vanished Era” which is a compilation of interviews with filmmakers such as John Sayles, Quentin Tarantino, Kevin Smith, Darren Aronofsky, David O. Russell and others, who came of age during the reign of video rentals. The book “constructs a living, personal narrative of an era of cinema history which, though now gone, continues to shape film culture today.”

I haven’t read this book yet, but some of my favorite film books are compilations like this, filmmakers and screenwriters talking about either their favorite movies, their favorite lesser-known films, or the making of their first movie. After the jump you can watch a I Lost it at the Video Store trailer, and find more information about the book.

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