Nicolas Cage in Left Behind

Nicolas Cage is a worker. Sometimes I wonder if him and Samuel L. Jackson have a bet on which one of them can appear in the most movies in a year. Of course there’s nothing wrong with liking to work. Sometimes working at that rate just means a filmography becomes more about quantity than quality, which has been the case with Cage’s career over the past few years. Don’t bother worrying about the actor, though, because Nicolas Cage has no regrets. The only regret might be never working with director Quentin Tarantino — but will a Nicolas Cage Quentin Tarantino collaboration ever happen?

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quentin tarantino netflix

Earlier this week we ran a trailer and information about a new book titled I Lost It At The Video Store. The book by Tom Roston features a compilation of interviews with filmmakers such as John Sayles, Quentin Tarantino, Kevin Smith, Darren Aronofsky, David O. Russell giving an oral history of the video store era of cinema history.

The Playlist published an excerpt from the book, but I wanted to highlight a few quotes from Pulp Fiction/Django Unchained filmmaker Quentin Tarantino and Requiem for a Dream/Noah director Darren Aronofsky talking about their relationships with streaming services like Netflix and the process of editing a film to be watched on an iPhone. Hit the jump to read the Quentin Tarantino Netflix comments and more.

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‘I Lost It At The Video Store’ Trailer

I Lost it at the Video Store trailer
I’m old. When I wanted to see a movie I used to visit a store to rent movies on a cassette tape. It sounds like an old archaic system, but the experience was rather magical. And while the quality wasn’t even standard definition, far below the 4K High Definition resolutions of today, it didn’t seem to matter. Don’t get me wrong, you’d have to pry my AppleTV from my cold dead hands — I love the instant availability and quality that the digital age affords us — but there was something magical about that video store.

Tom Roston has written a new book titled “I Lost It at the Video Store: A Filmmakers’ Oral History of a Vanished Era” which is a compilation of interviews with filmmakers such as John Sayles, Quentin Tarantino, Kevin Smith, Darren Aronofsky, David O. Russell and others, who came of age during the reign of video rentals. The book “constructs a living, personal narrative of an era of cinema history which, though now gone, continues to shape film culture today.”

I haven’t read this book yet, but some of my favorite film books are compilations like this, filmmakers and screenwriters talking about either their favorite movies, their favorite lesser-known films, or the making of their first movie. After the jump you can watch a I Lost it at the Video Store trailer, and find more information about the book.

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Quentin Tarantino's Original Pulp Fiction Cast Wish List

Quentin Tarantino has always been praised for his casting choices, and its obvious that the filmmaker puts a lot of thought into which actors might be good for which characters. The writer/director even seems to write certain roles for particular actors.  Now a copy of Quentin Tarantino’s cast wish-list for Pulp Fiction has made its way online, showing the filmmaker’s original choices for the film’s cast, from first choices to back-up/alternate choices.

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It Follows 700 4

Earlier this week, Quentin Tarantino took a moment to critique one of this year’s surprise horror hits, It Follows. “It’s one of those movies that’s so good you get mad at it for not being great,” he started, before going on to explain how he would’ve fixed it. (Short version: Tarantino didn’t think the film did a good job of sticking to its own mythology.)

Now the director of It Follows has responded. And while it’s gotta sting a bit to watch as an acclaimed director picks apart your movie in public, he seems to be handling it pretty well. David Robert Mitchell Quentin Tarantino comments after the jump. Read More »

It Follows

Among the many interesting reveals from Quentin Tarantino‘s recent wide-ranging interview was that he “really liked” David Robert Mitchell‘s indie horror hit It Follows. “It was the best premise I’ve seen in a horror film in a long, long, long time,” said Tarantino.

However, he continued, he had some problems with the premise’s execution: “It’s one of those movies that’s so good you get mad at it for not being great.” So how would Tarantino have made It Follows great? Read the Quentin Tarantino It Follows comments after the jump. Read More »

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Quentin Tarantino interview highlights

Quentin Tarantino gave a wide-ranging interview that ran over the weekend, and the outspoken filmmaker had plenty to say about the state of the industry, in addition to speaking about his upcoming film The Hateful Eight.

The most interesting comments in Tarantino’s talk are about that new movie, as he says that it chiefly concerns racial conflict, and as such is very relevant to the strife we’ve seen as cities like Ferguson and Baltimore react to killings of young black men and women by police.

We’ve highlighted eight of the most interesting things Tarantino had to say about his new film, his career, and the state of the industry overall, and you can read those below. Read More »

Hateful Eight posters

There are seven posters representing the snow and the eight lead characters of Quentin Tarantino‘s new western, and the full set of The Hateful Eight posters is now out in the wild.

Two of those characters, John Ruth and Daisy Domergue, played by Kurt Russell and Jennifer Jason Leigh, were featured on the first poster release, and over the last few days more sheets have been released. There’s now one each for the rest of the cast: Samuel L. Jackson, Walton Goggins, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Bruce Dern, and Demian Bichir.

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Quentin Tarantio cinematography

If you’re an observant love of cinema, aside from likely knowing each and every film directed by Quentin Tarantino, you know that it’s fairly easily to recognize his work. This isn’t just because of the extensive dialogue and endless homages to classic, obscure films, but simply by the way he shoots his movies. From dancing scenes to trunk shots to sprawling overhead God’s eye sequences, Tarantino has a very distinct style.

Now a new supercut takes a tributary look at the cinemtography of all of Tarantino’s films, from Reservoir Dogs to his most recent Django Unchained. This slick video highlighting some of the best Quentin Tarantino cinematography will make you want to have a Tarantino marathon very soon. Read More »