Laurent Durieux - Phantom of the Opera header

Ask most people what they know about The Phantom of the Opera and they’re likely to reference the Broadway musical. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s adaptation of the novel by Gaston Leroux is far and away the best known version of the 1909 story about mysterious man in an Opera House who falls in love with a new actress.

Long before that version of the story hit the stage, Phantom was adapted into a well-received 1925 silent film starring Lon Chaney. That version has recently seen a resurgence because of its connection to the Universal Monsters series, and also a timeless aesthetic which lends itself to gorgeous posters.

Of course that’s where I was going with that, right? Dark Hall Mansion has revealed a brand new poster in their ongoing Seminal Film Series: The Phantom of the Opera by Laurent Durieux. It’s a beautiful and evocative representation of the film and goes on sale next week. Read More »

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Watch A Brief History of Movie Title Designs

As part of the screening put together in relation to the SXSW Title Design Competition, Ian Albinson from the website The Art of the Title Sequence put together a nice two and a half minute compendium of excellent film titles. (That features an occasional piece of television, too.) For any long-time film lover, this little video will probably elicit quite a few responses simply on the strength of the title cards on display. I queued several films to re-watch after exposure to just a few seconds of their titles.

Check out the collection after the jump. Read More »

Andrew Lloyd Webber has announced that a Phantom of the Opera sequel is coming at the end of 2009. Phantom: Love Never Dies will be set a decade or so after the original installment, and The Phantom (yes, he’s still alive) has relocated to, then very popular, Coney Island of Brooklyn, New York. The production will have a historic simultaneous opening in three cities — on Broadway in New York, London’s West End, and Shanghai.

Webber isn’t revealing any names as far as who has been cast as the Phantom or Christime (who will also be in the sequel) but does say that the roles have been pretty much cast at this point. The Times of London says that Hugh Jackman and Gerard Butler are possible candidates. Butler played the Phantom in the 2004 film adaptation. Jack O’Brien (The Full Monty, Hairspray) will direct the production, with sets designed by five time Tony Award winner Bob Crowley (Carousel, The History Boys, Mary Poppins). If the production is as big of a hit as I expect it to be, I’m sure a big screen Hollywood adaptation won’t be far behind.

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