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It’s a crazy, mixed up world and we are thankful for movies that offer proof. Slashfilm’s Weekend Weirdness examines such flicks, whether in the form of a premiere for a provocative indie, a mini review, or…the Boosh!

“We were going to do [a tour of America],” Noel Fielding admitted to an enthused, sold-out crowd last weekend at the 92Y Tribeca in NYC. “But then my hat caught fire.” Fielding’s voice during the last bit softened into the feigned shyness typified by the London hipsters and rockstars The Mighty Boosh has expertly razzed through the aughts onward.

There was a waft of irony to their appearance in the city, since fans had come to the venue, not to see The Boosh perform, but to watch a new doc entitled Journey of the Childmen about their 2008/2009 tour in the UK. Tickets for two exclusive screenings actually sold out before it was announced online that The Boosh would be attending. Their presence resulted in a unique pop culture snapshot; here was a dedicated fanbase and two of the most original British comedians working today, all parties aware of the gap in mainstream crossover awareness outside the screening room. And in minutes, the former would be watching the latter perform to a 12,000 person arena many miles away.

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Drawing early comparisons to the films of Michel Gondry is Bunny and The Bull, the debut feature from writer/director Paul King, best known for his work on the BBC‘s wonderfully disoriented comedy series The Mighty Boosh. The movie co-stars the Boosh‘s Noel Felding and Julian Barratt, the latter of which can be seen in the below clip…as a bum who savors a creature’s teat. Peta is likely nonplussed, but it’s pretty funny, to Tom Green included.

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One of the best BBC sitcoms of recent years is The Mighty Boosh, created by and starring Julian Barratt and Noel Fielding and directed by Paul King. Originating as a stage show – essentially stand up comedy with theatrical elaborations – then undergoing a typical Britcom rite of passage on radio, Boosh became an instant TV cult with it’s first airing in 2004. I reckon the show has notably improved not just once but twice with the advent of each subsequent season. I like shows that keep getting better and wish there were more of them.

Boosh is effectively a flat share comedy (though that flat has also been a zoo, dessert island or magic shop as well as a flat) which takes determinedly off the wall dives into pop surrealism. It’s effortlessly the hippest show on the BBC. For the last year now a feature film version of the show has been in development, which seems to mean Fielding and Barratt have been writing away while Paul King has been shooting his debut feature, the Boosh-less Bunny & The Bull. More on that beyond the break – as well as a video with some of the Boosh boys talking about their desired casting for the big screen episode.

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