This Week in DVD & Blu-ray is a column that compiles all the latest info regarding new DVD and Blu-ray releases, sales, and exclusive deals from stores including Target, Best Buy and Fry’s.

Rent It

LET ME IN
How you respond to Let Me In will depend almost entirely on whether or not you’ve seen the original. On a purely technical level, its craft is unquestionable. Director Matt Reeves has thoughtfully and skillfully reconstructed Let the Right One In for American audiences, maintaining the solemn mood and tender intimacy of the boy-girl relationship that made the original so heartbreakingly compelling. But that’s also the problem: the film is strictly an imitation. Save for some narrative streamlining and one astounding new set piece, this movie lacks any identity of its own. It is nearly a shot-for-shot remake, and it makes very little attempt to differentiate itself. Because of this, anyone who has seen and loved the original (as I did) will find it nearly impossible to divorce themselves from the material. Which is a shame, really, because it many ways the film is an improvement over its predecessor. Reeves managed to not only identify what worked so well in the original and recreate it with better actors, but he also found what was lacking and axed it completely. In spite of this, my loyalty to the original—or rather, originality in general—prevents me from recommending the film to the same extent that I did that film. And even if you haven’t seen Let the Right One In, I would still suggest viewing that film prior to this one. For me, it was the original’s relaxed, indie sensibilities that allowed for the film’s now-iconic moments to resonate so vividly, bringing an unexpectedness to the brief yet startlingly effective action beats. Moreover, the shots themselves were decidedly more quiet and restrained, which in turn made them all the more haunting. Had I seen Let Me In first, I am doubtful that the film would’ve struck a chord with me in the same way Let the Right One In did.
Available on Blu-ray? Yes.
Notable Extras: DVD – An audio commentary with director Matt Reeves, featurettes (“From The Inside: A Look at the Making of Let Me In”, “The Art of Special Effects”), unrated deleted scenes, and a Car Crash Sequence Step-by-Step. Blu-ray – Includes everything on the DVD, as well as a Dissecting Let Me In feature, and a digital copy of the film.

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BEST BLU-RAY PRICE
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The 10 Most Beautiful Films of 2010

I hope everyone here had a happy holiday break! I had the chance to finally sit back, relax aimlessly for a few days, and take in some Netflix Watch Instantly films that I wouldn’t get to during the normal course of events. One such film was Sweetgrass, which guest Matt Singer discussed on a previous episode of the /Filmcast. As I watched, I was struck with the film’s breathtaking beauty, and I realized that there’ve been some great-looking films this past year.

Here are what I consider to be the 10 most beautiful films of 2010. There’s no grand unifying theory to this list, other than that these are movies I personally really enjoyed looking at for one reason or another. They are presented in no particular order.

Oh, and tune in on Tuesday night at 9 PM EST at slashfilm’s live page to hear us countdown our top 10 films of 2010!
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This week, David ChenDevindra Hardawar and Adam Quigley discuss the prospects of Jodie Foster’s Beaver, ponder a Buffy reboot, wonder if Mark Wahlberg can fill in for Nolan North, and mourn the passing of some amazing cinematic talents. Special guest Matt Singer joins us from IFC News.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Join us for our next live broadcast on Sunday, December 12 at Slashfilm’s live page, where we’ll be reviewing David O. Russell’s The Fighter.

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It’s that time of the year when there will be one film awards ceremony and/or critical poll after another, and we’ve got the results of three to kick off this week. The European Film Awards took place in Estonia over the weekend, and Roman Polanski‘s The Ghost Writer scored six awards, including Best Film, Best Director and Best Actor, the latter for Ewan McGregor.

Meanwhile, at the British Independent Film Awards, The King’s Speech took best picture, while Monsters director Gareth Edwards scored Best Director.  And the Washington, DC Area Film Critics Association honored The Social Network, Inception and The Fighter. All the lists are after the break. Read More »

Stephen King’s Top 10 Films of 2010

I don’t always agree with best-selling author Stephen King‘s opinions, but I still love reading his thoughts about the film world. King has published his annual listing of the top 10 films of the year in the latest issue of Entertainment Weekly.

His 2008 list included Death Race, Lakeview Terrace and The Ruins. In 2009, King agreed with the mainstream critics in naming The Hurt Locker as the best film of the year, but the rest of his list was the opposite of conventional – for example, #2 is The Last House on the Left, which he claims is “on par with The Silence of the Lambs” and “easily the most brilliant remake of the decade.” Other films included District 9, The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 and 2012.

Which films did he choose for his best of 2010 list? King picked Matt ReevesLet Me In as his #1 film of 2010 declaring it “the best horror film of the decade.” Hit the jump to see the full list in brief.

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Monsters

Magnolia Pictures/Magnet have presented us with an exclusive first look at four behind the scenes photos from Gareth Edwards’ low budget monster movie Monsters. Since screening the film at Cannes, we’ve been hyping the movie (read my mini review here). We called it Lost in Translation in a world infested by monsters. Check the photos out now after the jump.

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Monsters turned into a serious career move for director Gareth Edwards. It led to him having a deal to write and direct a film that Timur Bekmambetov will produce. We don’t know much about the picture, other than it will be an ““epic human story, set in a futuristic world without humanity.”

Mr. Edwards has now talked a bit more about the film, and while he doesn’t reveal any more of the plot, he makes it sound like a serious expansion of the scope of his current film. Read More »

Ep. 117 – Catfish (GUEST: Katey Rich from CinemaBlend)

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catfishThis week, David Chen, Devindra Hardawar, and Adam Quigley discuss the relevance of the short list of directors to take on Superman, share thoughts on Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps and Legend of the Guardians, and try to unravel the truth behind Catfish. Special guest Katey Rich joins us from Cinemablend.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Join us on Sunday (10/3) at 10 PM EST / 7 PM PST at Slashfilm’s live page as we review The Social Network.

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