I don’t like to talk about movie marketing when reviewing a film. The trailer isn’t the movie. Each has completely different aims, and judging a movie based on a trailer is the wrong road to take. But in the case of Tarsem’s slightly modern, very kid-oriented Snow White story Mirror Mirror, the trailers are worth mentioning. They sold something like a Lifetime movie — a stilted, ungainly romance. Yet I was pleasantly surprised to see that the film proper is laced with the imaginative visuals that one expects from Tarsem, but also flashes of cleverness in action scenes and modern, media-aware dialogue that should be glaringly anachronistic, but works more often than not. Mirror Mirror is clearly a film for kids, but it aspires to please adults as well, and features just enough zing to do so, at least occasionally. Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

While I haven’t loved most of the marketing for Tarsem Singh‘s Mirror, Mirror so far, one element that’s actually drawn a few laughs out of me is Armie Hammer‘s performance as Prince Andrew Alcott. He’s clearly having so much fun with the character that it’s tough not to be won over, and now a new featurette takes advantage of that appeal by focusing on Hammer and his well-intentioned but ditzy charcter.

But it seems I’m not the only one that hasn’t been such a fan of the kiddie comedy’s trailers. In a recent interview, Singh noted his own displeasure at the way his film was being sold. Could this mean that Mirror, Mirror won’t quite be the the cringe-inducing hamfest we’ve been led to expect? Watch the featurette and read Singh’s comments after the jump.

Read More »

I can’t tell whether it’s that the footage of Tarsem Singh‘s Mirror Mirror is truly getting better, or whether I’m just developing some weird cinematic version of Stockholm Syndrome. But after kind of hating the first trailer, the film started to grow on me with yesterday’s featurette, and now this new international trailer has me kind of, sort of, actually looking forward to seeing it.

The new video offers up a bit more than the previous one did in terms of plot, and serves up some fresh jokes as well. Lily Collins stars as the fairytale princess, while Armie Hammer plays the handsome prince, Julia Roberts the evil queen, and Nathan Lane her pitiable sycophant. Watch the video after the jump.

Read More »

The Great Snow White Showdown of 2012 has been brewing for about a year and a half now, but it looks like we’ll have to wait just a tiny bit longer to see how things shake out. Mirror Mirror has pushed its release date back by two weeks from March 16 to March 30, the better to take advantage of spring break and the Easter holiday. Snow White and the Huntsman is still scheduled to open June 1.

In the meantime, though, we have a couple of new looks at both in the form of a behind-the-scenes video from Mirror Mirror and a just-released photo of Kristen Stewart in Snow White and the Huntsman. The more we see of each, the clearer it’s becoming that whatever their respective strengths or weaknesses, the two movies are very different beasts. Hit the jump for more.

Read More »

The Great Snow White Race of 2011 resulted in two films: Universal’s Snow White and the Huntsman, a Lord of the Rings-style action film starring Kristen Stewart, Charlize Theron and Chris Hemsworth, and Relativity’s Mirror, Mirror, a lighter, more family-oriented comedy featuring Lily Collins, Julia Roberts and Armie Hammer.

Mirror, Mirror will be the first to theaters, with a March 16 release date. The first trailer for the film didn’t convince me that director Tarsem had made a movie I’m going to be excited to see, but Mirror, Mirror could still end up being a decent family movie.

Now we’ve got a look at some behind the scenes images from the film, showing how Tarsem’s all-stage built production came together. Check them out below. Read More »

Trailer for Tarsem Singh’s ‘Mirror, Mirror’

After months of hearing all about Tarsem Singh‘s “sickeningly kiddie” Snow White project Mirror, Mirror and glimpsing the bright, colorful images from the set, we finally have our first look at some actual footage from the film. The very first official trailer has now hit the web, and it looks… well, see for yourself.

Mirror, Mirror features Lily Collins as the classic fairy tale princess, with Julia Roberts as the Evil Queen, Sean Bean as the King, Armie Hammer as the handsome prince, and Nathan Lane as some guy named Brighton that I don’t remember from my childhood storybooks. Watch the video after the jump.

Read More »

After months and months of being referred to as “Relativity Media’s untitled Snow White project,” Tarsem Singh‘s take on the classic fairy tale finally has a title. The name they’re going with is Mirror, Mirror, which seems like a pretty obvious pick in retrospect.

Interestingly, the news comes just a few days after director Singh said in an interview that if it were up to him, he’d simply call it Snow. At the time, he said the decision wasn’t his to make, and that one of the reasons the movie took so long to get a title had to do with “legal stuff being sorted out.” In the same conversation, he described his own film as “sickeningly kiddie” and explained why his interest in creating a children’s film isn’t so surprising after all. Read more after the jump.

Read More »

The last Mondo poster, created to celebrate Guillermo del Toro’s film Pan’s Labyrinth, sold out in seconds. I expect the same fate for two of the three posters the company will release tomorrow.

Mondo’s Star Trek series continues with images for the 1967 episode Mirror, Mirror, and the 1966 two-parter The Menagerie. The latter is an early landmark in the series, as it uses footage from the rejected pilot episode The Cage, which featured Jeffrey Hunter as Captain Pike rather than William Shatner as James Kirk.

And as a bonus, the company is selling stock of a poster for David Cronenberg‘s early film Rabid, in which emergency plastic surgery leads to Marilyn Chambers sprouting a stinger with which she preys on others. Oh, the stinger is in her armpit. (Of course.) The poster is a lot less lurid than you might expect for early Cronenberg — it is almost eerie. Check out all three after the break.  Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web: