high-rise trailer

When I wrote about the new poster for Ben Wheatley‘s High-Rise a few days ago, I wondered how StudioCanal and Magnet were going to sell this mesmerizing, strange, and frequently brutal satire. Now that a trailer has arrived, it’s time to start answering that question.

The new High-Rise trailer is light on character and story, but heavy on mood, putting the film’s stifling atmosphere and slick visuals at the forefront. The best thing that can be said about this preview, which you can watch below, is that is does a fantastic job of capturing what this difficult sell of a movie actually feels like.

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high-rise poster

I ended up seeing High-Rise twice at last year’s Fantastic Fest film festival. The first time was because I will see every single movie that Ben Wheatley makes. The second time was to make sure I wasn’t crazy for loving it as much as I did. It’s rare to see a movie divide people quite like how High-Rise divides its audience. This is a genuinely unpleasant, ugly little movie and it’s hard to begrudge anyone for loathing it. But it’s also smart and blackly hilarious and impeccably crafted satire. High-Rise finds Wheatley wielding a sledgehammer to drive home his various points, but it’s hard to care about subtlety when that instrument is being utilized by a master filmmaker. This is finely orchestrated, bravely performed, sci-tinged chaos that daring film fans should go out of their way to see.

All of that to introduce at new poster for the movie? You betcha. Check out the new High-Rise poster below.

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The whole tongue-in-cheek, gory, B-movie grindhouse thing is so played out these days. How many ways can you film the explosion of the human head or the mutilation of a body part, really? Before Hobo With A Shotgun, I would have said there was some sort of ceiling to that kind of carnage. But co-writer and director Jason Eisener has come up with so many new, creative ways to destroy the human body (and insane dialogue to go along with it) that, I dare say, he’s taken the tongue-in-cheek, gory, B-movie grindhouse thing to a whole new level. Hobo With A Shotgun is so incredibly over the top with its excess, fans of this genre are going to be bowing to it. Read More »

You’ve already seen a short teaser trailer for Quentin Dupieux’s killer tire movie Rubber but now that its April 1 release date is fast approaching, Magnet has released the real deal: a two-and-a-half minute glimpse at one of the most unique films to get a release in recent years.

Having experience this movie first hand, here’s my 2 cents on this trailer. It gives away a lot. You don’t know it’s doing so, it just looks like a bunch of really weird images edited together, but if any of those images stick in your head, they could hypothetically taint your enjoyment of this absolutely original, you-don’t-know-where-it’s-going film. Still, a lot of you don’t care about that sort of thing and if you don’t, you’re gonna love this trailer. Check it out after the jump. Read More »

One of the films that featured prominently on the 2010 festival circuit, but didn’t get a 2010 U.S. release, was Quentin Dupieux‘s art house thriller Rubber. Starring a rolling, silent, killer tire, the concept alone is enough to get you into the theater. Thankfully, Dupieux then delivers the goods: a surprising blend of horror and meta-dissection of movie watching itself. After playing Cannes, Fantastic Fest, AFI and others, Rubber is finally going to get a proper release. Magnet will release the film to Video On Demand on February 25 and then theatrically on April 1. Read more after the break. Read More »

Hobo With a Shotgun started life as a  trailer for a grindhouse film that didn’t exist, and writer/director Jason Eisener spent much of this year shooting an expanded feature version starring Rutger Hauer as the title character. The film is scheduled for the Sundance Film Festival in January, but while there it won’t have to go through the rigors of a sale for US distribution rights. Magnet, the genre arm of Magnolia, has picked up the film for distribution in the US. Read More »

We’ve now got a very good idea what to expect out of Magnet’s Six-Shooter Film Series come early 2011. (Assuming the company repeats the pattern established over the past two years.) Earlier this week the company, which is the genre arm of Magnolia, picked up The Troll Hunter, and now it has bought distribution rights to both Christopher Smith‘s Black Death and Brad Anderson‘s Vanishing on 7th Street. Those three films could very well end up being half the company’s Six-Shooter slate for 2011. Read More »