The end of the year is approaching and that means award season. Every year it starts with regional critic groups and then slowly gets to the bigger, more influential groups leading up through the Academy Awards. If a film hopes to gain an Academy Award nomination, its first major hurdle is the Screen Actors Guild. Actors make up the majority of Academy voters so it’s an important group of champions to win over heading towards the Dolby Theater (formerly the Kodak Theater).

This year, the Screen Actors Guild has nominated actors from Argo, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, Les Misérables, Lincoln and Silver Linings Playbook for its top award, Best Ensemble, with those last two leading all other films with four nominations each. Noticeably absent? Zero Dark Thirty, the current Oscar front-runner. Does this hurt its chances? See how the film did in all the other categories below. Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

There’s a moment about 30 minutes into Tom Hooper‘s musical adaptation of Les Miserables where you’re either with it or not. Anne Hathaway, beaten and bruised, hair raggedly cropped short, sings the iconic song “I Dreamed a Dream.” She does so on her own, in a single long-take close-up that lasts at least three minutes. It’s Hooper’s way of telling the audience this film is going to be dark, it’s going to be dirty, it’s going to have emotions, and yes, it’s going to be these actors (who we know better as Wolverines, Catwomen, Gladiators or Mean Girls) singing — and only singing — their hearts out for almost three hours.

In this moment, Hathaway provides one of the most stirring and impressive emotional moments of 2012, perfect capturing the tone and wonder of Les Miserables. It’s mesmerizing, moving and magical. Read More »

Tom Hooper follows up his Oscar-winning The King’s Speech with a film version of the stage musical classic Les Miserables, and the first public screenings of the film were met with great enthusiasm, first by a New York City audience, then by LA viewers. Sure, the deck was stacked in favor of Hooper and the film, given that the NYC audience was a particularly theater-friendly crowd, so the reaction might not be a pure gauge of how to expect the film will play elsewhere.

But with the cast (Hugh Jackman, Anne Hathaway, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, Eddie Redmayne, Samantha Barks, Helena Bonham Carter, and Sacha Baron Cohen) drawing raves and individual musical numbers earning huge applause, the film does sound like a great success. Reviews are embargoed at this point, but a selection of reactions is below. Read More »

The year-end prestige film crush is just beginning, and one of the crown jewels from this year’s crop looks to be Tom Hooper‘s Les Misérables. Between the source material and the on- and off-camera talent, it’s totally clear why Universal believes the musical has the potential to be a massive critical and commercial hit, and the trailers so far have lived up to those lofty expectations.

As part of the promotional push, Les Misérables has landed a lush Annie Leibovitz-photographed spread in Vogue. Hit the jump to see new portraits of stars Hugh Jackman (Jean Valjean), Russell Crowe (Javert), Anne Hathaway (Fantine), Amanda Seyfried (Cosette), Eddie Redmayne (Marius), and Sacha Baron Cohen and Helena Bonham Carter (the Thénardiers).

Read More »

While we’ve seen a teaser and extended production trailer for Tom Hooper‘s new adaptation of Les Miserables, this UK trailer is the fullest, most traditional look at the film to date.

It has a lot of footage we haven’t previously seen, and introduces most of the primary cast, including Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Anne Hathaway, Amanda Seyfried, Sacha Baron Cohen, Helena Bonham-Carter, and Eddie Redmayne. We get to hear almost all of them in song, which is a first for some, and see a good bit of the grand scope of Hooper’s take on the revolutionary France, as originally told by Victor Hugo. Read More »

Individual character posters are practically de rigeur when marketing a big franchise tentpole, but it’s a strategy that works way better when the film in question has, say, four to ten main characters. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey features no fewer than seventeen characters that Warner Bros.’ marketing team has deemed onesheet-worthy, which just seems like overkill no matter how important each of them are.

Meanwhile, Universal’s solution for the sprawling cast of Les Misérables is to pair some of them together for their posters. The problem is that the two released this week — spotlighting the Thénardiers and Cosette and Marius — don’t really look like they’re from the same movie. Check them out after the jump.

Read More »

Yesterday Universal moved the opening of Les Miserables to Chrismas Day, and now we’ve got an extended preview of the film. This isn’t quite as epic in scope as the six-minute debut trailer for Cloud Atlas, but it is a nice long look at Tom Hooper’s take on the classic musical story that gives a lot more than we saw in the first teaser trailer back in May.

There’s a lot of behind the scenes footage here, with an emphasis on the fact that every take was sung live during the shooting of the film. The great bit of the interviews here is that you’ll get moments like Hugh Jackman signing alternate versions of one of his key soliloquies. You’ll see much more of the cast here, from Jackman and Russell Crowe (playing Jean Valjean and Inspector Javert) to Anne HathawayAmanda SeyfriedSamantha Barks, and Eddie Redmayne. You won’t really see Helena Bonham Carter or Sacha Baron Cohen, nor will you hear Crowe sing. But all in all, this is great stuff. Read More »

Briefly: Universal has seemingly decided that the new film adaptation of Les Miserables, starring Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, and Anne Hathaway and directed by Tom Hooper (The Kings Speech), makes a good Christmas present. (A present for Universal, at least.) The film has been pushed back to a December 25 opening.

It doesn’t hurt that the December 25 berth has less competition now than it did not long ago, as Ang Lee’s Life of Pi was pulled forward to November 21 and Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby was pushed to 2013.

But the month is still crowded, as Les Mis will face direct competition from Django Unchained, and the comedies The Guilt Trip and Parental Guidance. There’s a very busy two weeks in the runup to Dec 25, with The Hobbit opening on the 14th, and then Monsters Inc 3D, This is 40, Zero Dark Thirty, and Jack Reacher opening on the 21st. Les Mis was originally scheduled to hit on the 7th, then moved opposite The Hobbit, but with the slightly cleared-out Christmas Day opening, the film is likely do have more of a chance. [Deadline]

 

Click Here To Read Older Movie News
Cool Posts From Around the Web: