C3PO Batman

Want to see more set videos from Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice? Who really came up with the story behind Guardians of the Galaxy? Which Twin Peaks actor leads the new names in the cast of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.? What does Arkham Asylum look like in Gotham? Is the Honest Trailer for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze funny? Care to learn more about the costumes, makeup and even some alternatve looks of Guardians of the Galaxy? Which supervillain is coming to The Flash? Read about all this and more in a special weekend edition of Superhero Bits. Read More »

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Twin Peaks deleted scene

It’s safe to say that I am unreasonably excited about the upcoming Twin Peaks blu-ray box set. Rumors of new Twin Peaks material have always seemed both unrealistic and unappealing — the show’s ship has sailed, and we’ve all got to accept that. But the reveal of deleted scenes shot between 1989 and 1992 is something else altogether. That’s a holy grail, a set of artifacts from when the story was really alive.

The blu-ray set has a bunch of deleted material — almost a feature-length set of scenes and outtakes from the feature film Fire Walk With Me, and also some scenes cut from the TV series. We’ve seen a glimpse of some of that stuff via the first trailer for the box set. Below, we have the first full deleted scene to share. It’s a short bit from the TV series, specifically from the pilot, showing a thing we’ve never seen before: the moment when Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) meets Donna Hayward (Lara Flynn Boyle) for the first time. Read More »

Breathe In

Guy Pearce was last seen in Iron Man 3, and Felicity Jones will soon appear in The Amazing Spider-Man 2. But in Drake DoremusBreathe In, they’ll both ditch the superpowered world for a quieter, messier, more grounded one.

In his follow-up to 2011′s festival hit Like Crazy, which also starred Jones, Doremus once again delves into the complicated desires that connect and separate people. Pearce plays music teacher Keith, whose family plays host to British exchange student Sophie (Jones). A talented piano player — not to mention a soulful, striking young woman — she draws Keith’s attention, and a forbidden bond begins to form. Amy Ryan and Mackenzie Davis also star, as Keith’s wife and daughter, respectively. Watch the first trailer after the jump.

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It’s been a few days since our last TV Bits (sorry!), so we have a ton of stuff to catch up on. After the jump:

  • Alexis Bledel, Kyle McLachlan, Hope Davis, and more get pilots
  • Downton Abbey loses one character but gains six more
  • Jeffrey Wright will be a series regular on Boardwalk Empire
  • A bunch of Fox shows including The Following get early renewals
  • The Zero Hour has gets cancelled by ABC after just three episodes
  • Will Jimmy Fallon take over for Jay Leno on The Tonight Show?
  • The X-Files finally gets a tenth season… as a comic book
  • Steven Soderbergh‘s Behind the Candelabra gets EW cover
  • Hannibal and Mad Men offer up not very revealing teasers
  • See character posters and an extended trailer for Game of Thrones
  • Peek behind the scenes of Breaking Bad‘s final season

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This is as good a Friday treat as we’re ever likely to offer. Just as I celebrated the 25th anniversary of the film this summer, it was announced that fifty minutes of deleted scenes had been recovered for David Lynch‘s seminal 1986 film Blue Velvet. Those scenes are available on the film’s new Blu-ray disc release, which streets next week, on November 8. I just watched a handful of the ‘new’ scenes, and while I haven’t yet seen them in full blu-ray resolution, what I did see suggested that the mastering and color correction all supervised by Lynch, were done with a meticulous attention to detail.

But don’t take my word for it. Below you’ll find a scene featuring Frank Booth (Dennis Hopper) threatening one of his ‘friends’ as Jeffrey Beaumont and Dorothy Vallens (Kyle MacLachlan and Isabella Rossellini) look on in horror. The clip is considered NSFW due to language and nudity, but given that this is a Frank Booth scene, I’m sure that does not come as a surprise.

Oh, and this features the infamous lost ‘woman lighting her nipples on fire’ moment, which Lynch has called a favorite scene. It has been discussed by many Lynch fans, but seen by few people. I’ve wanted to see this scene for many, many years. Read More »

Twenty-five years ago, David Lynch held a crystal clear mirror up to the face of America. Blue Velvet, which had played festivals in Montreal and Toronto, opened in the US on September 19, 1986. It was mainstream America’s real introduction to the private world of David Lynch. Eraserhead was still a cult film. While many people had seen The Elephant Man and some (not many) had seen Dune, few were prepared for the deeply idiosyncratic dreamscape Americana seen in Blue Velvet. Attacked for depicting a savage sexuality rarely seen on screen, the movie attracted no shortage of negative attention, but it quickly became regarded as a classic.

After twenty-five years Blue Velvet’s mysterious and musical vision of middle-American life remains seductive and powerful. Its gallows humor still earns laughs, and a peculiar clash of of classical Hollywood and noirish styles draws viewers in to Lynch’s unique world. The classic and noir impulses came out of Lynch’s own fondness for movies, but combined with his depiction of raw, violent sexuality they suggested something specific. That is, the deranged sexual power games in Blue Velvet aren’t anomalies; they’re what was always going on when the camera panned away in movies of the past.

The film established the career of Laura Dern and prevented Kyle MacLachlan’s image from being lost in the sandstorm of Dune. (MacLachlan’s look as the young Jeffrey Beaumont was actually based on Lynch’s own sartorial manner.) More than anything else it gave Dennis Hopper a framework in which to create one of the strongest, ugliest and most frightening characters ever seen on the silver screen: the raging gangster and sexual manchild Frank Booth.

The film’s twenty-fifth birthday is something to celebrate. As Jeffrey says when making a toast in the film, “here’s to an interesting experience.” Read More »

Michael and Mark Polish (Twin Falls Idaho, Northfork, The Astronaut Farmer) return with a new film titled Manure, which is set to premiere at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival. Téa Leoni, Billy Bob Thornton, Kyle MacLachlan star in a comic tale centered on manure salesmen in the early 1960s. The plot synopsis follows:

When a tragic accident ends the life of Mr. Rose, the genius behind Rose’s Manure Company, the livelihood of its loyal fleet of salesmen threatens to go, as they say, into the toilet. Enter estranged daughter Rosemary (Leoni), a high-class- cosmetics salesgirl, who steps in to take control. She is not sure she has a nose for the family business, but she is determined to make foul into profit. Little does she know that a ruthless, slick-talking fertilizer rep is plotting a takeover. Whether she likes it or not, she must trust her top salesman (Thornton) to devise a plan to regain Rose’s rightful position on top of the heap.”

The film’s tagline is “Sometimes you have to step in it to learn how to avoid it.” Even when I haven’t always loved the stories (Astronaut Farmer), I’ve very much enjoyed the look and tone of the Polish Brothers past film efforts. The early production photos show a beautiful unsaturated classic sepia golden look.

The early teaser trailer is short and sweet, and lack’s the golden look seen in the production photos. I’m guessing the trailer was just for promotional purposes. Sundance programer John Cooper calls the film “a wholly original, decidedly irreverent, yet enchantingly classic comic adventure from the 1960s.”

Manure premieres at the Sundance Film Festival on January 20th 2009.

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