With a few exceptions, the idea of remaking a classic horror film has proven to be one that faces many pitfalls. And when the original in question is Brian De Palma’s version of the Stephen King story Carrie, a film crafted with impressive style and quite a lot of moxie, there might be more pitfalls than usual. De Palma’s favored split-screen technique has been put to work telling many stories over the years, but the use of the device in Carrie is particularly good. The film is one of the director’s best, and one of the best adaptations of King’s work. It’s a tough act to follow.

But Boys Don’t Cry director Kimberly Peirce is an interesting choice to tackle a new version of Carrie, and she’s got a good start with the cast, as Chloe Moretz is the titular young girl whose telekenetic powers and emerging puberty put her at odds with her fundamentalist mom, played by Julianne Moore.

Portia Doubleday (Youth in Revolt) and Judy Greer (Arrested Development) were also added to the lineup today. More info on their roles, as well as Moretz’s comments about the Black Swan-like tone of this version, are below. Read More »

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One of the great pleasures of Brian De Palma’s original film adaptation of Stephen King‘s novel Carrie is the ravenous scenery chewing by Piper Laurie as the sex-fearing, fundamentalist mother of young telekinetic Carrie White. Sissy Spacek played Carrie in the original, and Chloe Grace Moretz will incarnate the character in a new film version to be directed by Kimberly Peirce (Boys Don’t Cry, Stop Loss).

We’ve heard a few possible names under consideration to play Carrie’s overbearing mom, but if the current report is correct we’ll see Julianne Moore imploring her daughter to reject her burgeoning sexuality and psychic powers.

Update: In addition to today’s news that parts of Carrie will use a found-footage approach, Deadline says that MGM has formally offered this role to Moore.

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Whether or not you think Stephen King‘s Carrie needs to be remade yet again, the latest incarnation of the ultimate outcast revenge tale continues chugging along. At least the project’s attracting some solid talent: Boys Don’t Cry helmer Kimberly Peirce is lined up to direct, with rising star Chloe Grace Moretz in the lead role. Now, with those two on board, the project is firming up its schedule and has announced a targeted spring 2013 release date. Read more after the jump.

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Kimberly Peirce (Boys Don’t Cry) is putting together a new film based on Stephen King‘s debut novel Carrie. Brian De Palma’s movie starring Sissy Spacek and John Travolta remains one of De Palma’s most entertaining films, packed as it is with over-the-top characterization and De Palma’s trademark love of split-screen imagery. So my first reaction to hearing about another new Carrie (this isn’t the first remake of the story) is ‘why?’ But having a female director is one way to make this seem like a worthwhile endeavor.

Now we’ve got the first indications of potential casting, as info has emerged about two possible choices to play the adolescent telekinetic Carrie White: 15-year-old Chloë Moretz (Kick-Ass, Dark Shadows) and 24-year-old Haley Bennett (Terrence Malick’s film formerly called Lawless).

Update: Deadline says that Moretz has been offered the role, and that after testing last weekend, she more or less got the job immediately.

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Kimberly Peirce has been hired to direct a remake Stephen King‘s Carrie. Peirce made her name with the 1999 indie film Boys Don’t Cry which featured an Oscar-winning performance from Hilary Swank. Peirce was voted one of Hollywood’s upcoming best new talents, but the filmmaker has yet to deliver a worthy follow-up, helming the 2008 war film Stop-Loss and an episode of The L Word.
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What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 30 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

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What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 46 (!?!) different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

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apatow producing

ComingSoon has learned that Judd Apatow is developing a romantic sex comedy project with Kimberly Peirce, the indie film director responsible for Boys Don’t Cry and Stop-Loss. Apatow also revealed that he’s developing a comedy project with John Carney, the director of the 2007 Sundance micro-budget musical Once.

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SXSW Movie Review: Stop-Loss

Stop-Loss

Directed and co-written by Kimberly Peirce (Boys Don’t Cry, The Last Good Breath), Stop Loss dramatizes the U.S. military’s “stop-loss” policy that allows the military to postpone the honorable discharge of U.S. soldiers and send them back to Iraq and Afghanistan for another tour of duty (usually a year to eighteen months). Alas, Stop Loss proves the adage that “good politics don’t make good art.” Stop Loss suffers from a serious case of implausibility and contrivance that fatally undermines whatever insight Peirce hopes to shed on the stop-loss policy and its unfairness toward the soldiers who serve in the U.S. military in foreign countries.

Sergeant Brandon King (Ryan Phillippe), leads his men, including his best friend, Sergeant Steve Shriver (Channing Tatum), Tommy Burgess (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), Isaac ‘Eyeball’ Butler (Rob Brown), Al ‘Preacher’ Colson (Terry Quay), and Rico Rodriguez (Victor Rasuk), down an alley to hunt down suspected terrorists or insurgents in Iraq. Pinned down in an ambush, King loses several men, but saves Shriver and Rodriguez from almost certain death. With his tour of duty almost done, King returns to his small hometown in Texas. There, he receives the Bronze Star for his bravery in saving his men and a Purple Heart for injuries sustained in combat. After celebrating with Shriver, Burgess, Shriver’s fiancé, Michelle (Abbie Cornish), his parents, Ida (Linda Emond) and Roy (Ciarán Hinds), King returns to the army base for debriefing.

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