The debate over the need for 3D in the home has been decided and 3D has triumphed. Or at least that’s how I feel after being manipulated by this genius ad campaign being run by LG for their new Home Theater 3D Sound System. They took iconic movie posters and flipped them around, showing the posters from alternative angles. After the jump, read more about the campaign and see posters for Kill Bill, Forrest Gump and Pretty Woman. Read More »

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Ever since Kill Bill Volume 1 was released in 2003, we’d been hearing that writer/director Quentin Tarantino ultimately planned on releasing both halves in one epic package. Kill Bill Volume 2 came out a year later and it seemed like a logical time for the big reveal. Nope. Then, in 2004, Tarantino showed a combined version of the film at the Cannes Film Festival that became known as Kill Bill: The Whole Bloody Affair. We thought that meant general audiences would finally get to see it in some way but alas, that was not the case. Amazon put up a page about it, images of box art leaked online and Tarantino himself said they were working on a new animation sequence but still, there was nothing. Years passed and finally Tarantino’s theater, the New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles, was permitted to show the film theatrically for the first time in the United States.

The print, which was the exact one that screened at Cannes – complete with French subtitles – played from March 27 (Tarantino’s birthday) through April 7 to mostly sold out audiences. After being out of town for the majority of the run, I was finally able to see the film on its final evening and it was a near perfect movie going experience. Four plus hours of bliss that make Kill Bill better than you ever thought it could be.

After the jump, we’ll discuss the changes and how those changes improve the original theatrical releases. Read More »

Tyler Stout created this awesome Kill Bill: The Whole Bloody Affair movie poster as a surprise for Quentin Tarantino‘s birthday screening of the uncut film at the New Beverly Cinema. Posters were sold at the screening, and will go online tomorrow on Mondo.

They are also selling a limited edition Japanese variant for $100, which OMG says is “printed on paper that lands somewhere between rice and parchment, plus it has some subtle changes to the art”. Only 225 copies were printed. The regular version is a 24? x 36? screenprint, has an edition of 600, and will cost $50. Both will go on sale tomorrow (Tuesday, April 5th) at a random time. Hit the jump to see both designs.

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[The following contains major spoilers for Sucker Punch]

Is Zack Snyder‘s Sucker Punch exploitation or empowerment? That’s the question that’s been floating around since even before the film was released, and it’s a pretty obvious one given that the movie was marketed entirely on the appeal of scantily clad young women wielding big ass weapons. Most of the reviews I’ve read of the film at least touch on the issue, and Snyder has preemptively addressed it in interviews by saying he intends the film to be empowering to women.

It’s not.

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What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 20 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

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VOTD: ‘Everything Is a Remix’

Thanks to DVD, compression software and services like YouTube and Vimeo, technology has changed the way we ingest visual content. But it hasn’t done as much as I’d like to the way we understand it.

Take the Everything is a Remix project, by editor Kirby Ferguson. The second installment was released this week, and it is a slick, well-written and edited piece of work that points out how much of the entertainment we consume is related to other entertainment. Specifically, it breaks down parts of Star Wars and Kill Bill into component elements, presenting scenes from those films alongside the original images re-purposed by George Lucas and Quentin Tarantino. But I’m left wanting more.

Watch both this film-centric second installment and a sidebar dissection of Kill Bill after the break, then hit the comments for a discussion of how the mechanism of influence from one film to another really affects storytelling. Read More »

LOL: Quentin Tarantino’s Trunk Shot

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If you’ve seen more than one movie by Quentin Tarantino, then you’ve surely noticed his signature POV trunk shot. The shot even has its own wikipedia page (take that Scorsese Squeeze!). Here is the background from wiki:

The Trunk shot is a camera angle used in cinema when one or more characters need to retrieve something or someone from the trunk of a car. …  This camera angle is often noted to be the trademark of film maker Quentin Tarantino who disputes that he puts the shot in his films as a trademark and simply asks “Where would you put the camera?” Although he did not invent it, Tarantino popularized the trunk shot, which is featured in Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown, and Kill Bill. In Death Proof, Tarantino’s traditional shot looking up at the actors from the trunk of a car is replaced by one looking up from under the hood. In Inglourious Basterds a “trunk shot” is used two times when Aldo Raine (Brad Pitt) crouches over a captured Nazi with one of his soldiers, cutting a swastika into their victim’s forehead (the shot is supposed to be the victim’s point of view).

After the jump you can see an image that collects all of Tarantino’s Trunk Shots. It first appeared on Reddit but has been making its way around the interwebs yesterday.

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“Telephone,” the newly released and incredibly hyped music video from avant-garish pop star Lady Gaga, sees her teaming Thelma and Louise-style with Beyonce in the hot yellow Pussy Wagon from Kill Bill. Why? We guess it’s relative to Gaga’s appreciation for renegade female empowerment, something Quentin Tarantino‘s bloody classic expresses like few films before or since.

According to Wikipedia, it’s the same Pussy used in the film, which, if memory serves, remains proudly owned by QT. Over the vid’s nine minutes, the truck gets more than a cameo, including a close-up of the name plate key chain in the ignition. The vid is also infused with a somewhat dated hyper-Japanese street culture sensibility that begs the question: why didn’t QT direct the video and knock it out of the park? Surely he would have been into the idea. Insert: priceless shots of bedazzled Gaga toes. Also, QT would have made sure the video—which doesn’t hit the 2010 epic wow mark—had tighter editing.

Another movie the vid pays homage to in its first mins is Caged Heat, the catty 1974 women-in-prison grindhouse flick directed by Jonathan Demme and produced by Roger Corman (recent recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Oscar). It’s also interesting to see the stylistic influence of Eric Wareheim, of [adult swim]‘s Tim and Eric, shine through in scenes with bad-cable-signal effects and schizo flourishes lifted from his cooler music videos for Major Lazer and other artists. The entire video and more screenshots after the jump. We welcome your thoughts.

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