Year-end top 10 lists can get pretty mind-numbing, as you see the same titles crop up again and again and again… and again, but filmmaker John Waters has set himself apart by both by posting his a bit early and by, oh yeah, being John Waters. You wouldn’t seriously expect the man who gave us Pink Flamingos, Female Trouble, and Hairspray to just name War Horse and The Artist like everrrrrrryone else, would you?

No, Waters’ tastes tend toward more unconventional choices, like Kaboom, Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives, and Justin Bieber: Never Say Never (seriously), with Pedro Almodovar‘s The Skin I Live In topping the list. Read the top 10 after the jump.

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What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 32 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

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Halfway through the new full trailer for Gregg Araki‘s new film Kaboom I’d already decided it looks like a sexually liberated, made for TV Donnie Darko when this quote came up: “A gonzo teen fantasy that’s tripper, hornier and more apocalyptically funny than ‘Donnie Darko’.” Oh, the coincidence!

We showed you some NSFW clips from the film when it was at TIFF last year, and a NSFW teaser trailer just a week ago, but this is the full trailer, from Sundance Selects. It lays out the basics of the film pretty well: really pretty college kids (could the trailer love Thomas Dekker‘s eyes any more?), lots of sex (not as much as in the NSFW teaser) and then some ‘freaky,’ weird stuff. Is this thing serious? Is it a cartoon that exploits classic stereotypes of hot college kids having sex, or a more ambitious piece of storytelling that subverts those same stereotypes? See if you can figure it out, after the break. Read More »

Page 2

What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 26 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

Read More »

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

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Can’t make it to Utah this month for the 2011 Sundance Film Festival? Here are your options. One – keep it locked right here to Slashfilm.com because myself, Peter Sciretta and David Chen will be on the scene reporting daily. Two – head to one of the cities that’s hosting a Sundance Film Festival USA screening. Or three – just click the On Demand button on your remote and join in to the Direct from the Sundance Film Festival initiative. Five specially selected films – four world premieres and one U.S. premiere – that will be playing at the festival will be available for a limited time on demand in on most major cable systems.

They are Mad Bastards, directed by Brendan Fletcher, Septien, directed by Michael Tully, These Amazing Shadows, directed by Kurt Norton, Uncle Kent, directed by Joe Swanberg and Kaboom, directed by Gregg Araki. Read full descriptions of each film and see stills after the jump. Read More »

The 2011 Sundance Film Festival is fast approaching and if you can’t make it to Utah yourself, the festival is bringing some of its highest profile films to a city near you.

The largest and most important U.S. film festival will take place from January 20-30 in and around Park City, Utah and the selection of films this year is nothing short of remarkable. In competition there are films like Michael Rapaport’s Tribe Called Quest documentary Beats, Rhymes and Life, and Vera Farmiga’s Higher Ground, out of competition there are films like Kevin Smith’s Red State and Morgan Spurlock’s documentary The Greatest Movie Ever Sold and even the short film selections have films with stars like Will Ferrell, Jack Black, Julia Stiles and Isabella Rossellini. And that’s not even beginning to scratch the surface. All in all, over 200 brand new movies will be screening at the festival and, if you are a film fan, you owe it to yourself to get up to Utah at some point for this momentous annual event.

If you can’t, though, there are two options. The first is to keep you browser locked onto /Film because we’ll have extensive coverage. Or, if you live in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Brookline, Massachusetts, Brooklyn, New York, Chicago, Illinois, Los Angeles, California, Madison, Wisconsin, Nashville, Tennessee, San Francisco, California or Seattle, Washington, just head to your local theater. On January 27, those cities are going to host special screenings of high profile films will be premiering at Sundance. It’s the Sundance Film Festival USA program. Get all the specifics after the break. Read More »

Fabrice Gobert's Lights Out (Simon Werner A Disparu...)

What many critics suspected has turned out to be true: this year’s line-up at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival has been disappointing. Many have complained that the films as a whole have been overlong, dark, depressing, and lacking hope. I would tend to agree with most of these criticisms. After a week of searching, I was finally able to find a film that is much more “my speed” than the rest of the selections.

Fabrice Gobert‘s Lights Out is a film set in a suburban French high school during the early 1990′s where a student named Simon Werner has disappeared. Did he run away? Was he abducted? Murdered? The movie begins at a drunken house party, where two teenagers go for a walk and discover a dead body in the woods. Is it Simon’s body?

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