David Fincher hasn’t quite settled on his next film yet, but in the meantime he’s keeping busy with other types of projects. He directed the first two episodes of Netflix’s original series House of Cards, and produced the Halo 4 commercial we saw last fall. His latest non-cinematic effort is the music video for “Suit & Tie,” the latest pop single by his The Social Network star Justin Timberlake. Watch it after the jump.

Read More »

Superheroes aren’t the only ones showing off their goods today. A batch of new photos have dropped for a trio of highly anticipated releases that don’t involve flowing capes or secret powers (at least, that we know of): Ti West‘s The Sacrament, Joel and Ethan Coen‘s Inside Llewyn Davis, and Terrence Malick‘s To the Wonder. Check them out after the jump.

Read More »

Clint Eastwood came out of semi-retirement as an actor to star in Trouble With the Curve, the directorial debut of his long-time production partner Robert Lorenz. Eastwood plays an aging baseball scout who is on a trip to check out a new player. But his eyesight is going — cue some drama right there — and his slightly estranged daughter (Amy Adams) joins him on the scout.

The basic premise sounds like a familiar, relatively safe one, and this first trailer for the film doesn’t challenge that idea. Eastwood’s persona here looks just a bit softer than his “git off my lawn!” attitude from Gran Torino, but this is still the sort of character we expect to see the star play at this point. Adams is more than strong enough to take him on, and Justin Timberlake looks gently appealing as another scout who has romantic intentions towards Adams. Read More »

Clint Eastwood suggested that he was done with acting after the release of his 2008 film Gran Torino. The then- 78-year old actor had already pulled away from acting in any films but his own, and had long seemed more interested in directing and scoring films than performing in front of the camera.

But then Robert Lorenz, who has worked with Eastwood for years, decided to direct his first film. The family drama centers around an aging baseball scout, and Eastwood agreed to play the role. And so Trouble With the Curve, which also stars Amy Adams and Justin Timberlake, opens on September 28 of this year. The production was in and around Atlanta and Macon earlier this year shooting the picture, and now we’ve got the first look at all three actors in two official stills from the movie. Read More »

We’ve seen quite a few TV series adapted to film, and they are almost uniformly forgettable. (Starsky and Hutch, The A-Team, Dark Shadows, and so on.) So if Paramount wants to make a Baywatch movie, based on the show that made a star of Pamela Anderson and revived the career of David Hasselhoff, let them go for it. Break out the wakeboards and the one-piece red suits, and the worst thing that can happen is there will be one more summer movie no one will remember three months later.

Now there’s a report that, if correct, suggests Paramount wants to make the film a lot more memorable. Supposedly the studio wants Justin Timberlake for the lead role, which sounds about as likely as the idea of any of the original Baywatch cast being able to swim the English Channel. Read More »

The fact that Justin Timberlake‘s two big roles in 2010 were Yogi Bear and The Social Network tells you everything you need to know about his uneven track record when it comes to picking projects, but his immediate future’s looking pretty bright. Last fall, he was offered one of the roles in the Coen Brothers’ ’60s folk piece Inside Llewyn Davis, and he’s now set to join Clint Eastwood and Amy Adams in Trouble With the Curve, the directorial debut of Eastwood’s longtime producing partner Robert Lorenz. More after the jump.

Read More »

Napster co-founder Sean Parker and Elton John may have something in common soon, if the legendary musician has his way. Back in September, we told you about an upcoming biopic of John to be produced by John himself through Rocket Pictures. Naturally, we wondered at the time who would be worthy of stepping into John’s shoes.

Well, it seems John’s been considering the same thing, and has landed on one particular talent as his top choice: Justin Timberlake. Considering that the actor/musician has actually played the part previously, in David LaChapelle’s music video for John’s “This Train Don’t Stop There Anymore,” John’s choice seems just about perfect. More details — plus a video of Timberlake-as-John — after the jump.

Read More »

Joel and Ethan Coen are assembling the cast for their new movie, Inside Llewyn Davis, which is based on the ’60s folk scene in Greenwich Village, NY. Oscar Isaac landed the title role just a few days ago, and he’ll play a guy loosely based on folk singer Dave Van Ronk, whose book The Mayor of MacDougal Street, chronicling his experience in the NYC folk revival, is part of the inspiration for the movie.

One of the other major leads could be Justin Timberlake, as the Coens have offered him the role of another folk singer named Jim. Read More »

I’ll say this for In Time, Andrew Niccol’s story describing a society driven into extreme class segregation by an economic system in which time is literally money: Niccol drives Justin Timberlake like a taskmaster. The singer-turned-actor runs like crazy, jumps, fights, and sweats his way through a movie that all too often feels more detached than a severed limb. It’s a very physical, very present performance that lends the movie some much-needed credit.

The detachment is due to the always on-the-nose, never close to subtle language used to wield the core concept as a club against economic disparity. I could never take the movie seriously because it was always so insistent about Making a Point. In Time, as written, is perhaps meaty and clever enough for a Twilight Zone episode. Stretched to feature length it is an unconvincing attempt at world-building and simply a deeply silly take on Bonnie and Clyde. Or Robin Hood. Or something. In Time wants to be a lot of things, but it never commits to any one.

Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Walking around the set of the upcoming sci-fi action film, In Time, is a smorgasbord of physical perfection. Attractive guys and girls are everywhere and even during an interview with the film’s stars, it’s hard not to glance behind them at the veritable fashion runway parading to craft services.

The reason everyone on set is so beautiful is that, in the world of in the world of In Time, the human body stops aging at 25. At that point, a genetic clock on your wrist begins counting down your final year of life. Through various legal, or illegal means, you can accrue time on your clock and hypothetically live-forever looking 25. Or you can run out of time and die, leaving nothing but good-looking corpse.

Only in this world can can Olivia Wilde be the mother of Justin Timberlake, Vincent Kartheiser be the father of Amanda Seyfried or Cillian Murphy play a gritty, 70-year-old detective. And this conceit could only come the mind of Andrew Niccol, the brainchild behind The Truman Show, S1mone and Gattaca, which also dealt with mortality.

“I think of [In Time] as the bastard child of Gattaca because [when I was making it] I thought the holy grail of genetic engineering, of course, is to find the aging gene and switch it off,” Niccol said, “But then the implications are so huge that I thought ‘That’s another movie.’ And it turns out, it’s become another movie.”

In an era where movie fans consistently bitch about a lack of original ideas, In Time is just that and on day 44 of a 54-day shoot, /Film was lucky enough to be on the Los Angeles set of the October 28th release, speaking to the stars, director, producer and learning that this world might look great, but is anything but. Read the full set visit after the jump Read More »