Thanks to her work on two unassailable teen comedy classics (1995′s Clueless and 1982′s Fast Times at Ridgemont High), Amy Heckerling will always have a special place in the movie lover’s heart. But even her most devoted fans can’t deny that she hasn’t had the best run of films lately. 2000′s Loser flopped, while 2007′s I Could Never Be Your Woman went straight to DVD. Now Vamps, her reunion with Clueless star Alicia Silverstone, is getting only a perfunctory theatrical run before heading to home video.

But the real problem with Vamps isn’t its release model, but the fact that it simply doesn’t look very good. The premise — two undead gals living it up in modern-day NYC — sounds stale coming in at the tail end of the vampire movie trend, and there’s not much in this trailer to suggest Heckerling does anything especially fresh or interesting with it. At least the cast looks good. In addition to Silverstone, Krysten RitterDan StevensWallace ShawnRichard LewisSigourney WeaverJustin Kirk, and Malcolm McDowell also star. Watch the video after the jump.

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Showtime Ending ‘Weeds’ After Season 8

Enjoy the Weeds season premiere when it rolls around in a couple of weeks, because it’ll be the show’s last. Showtime has just announced that the Mary-Louise Parker-starring pot comedy will end for good after its upcoming eighth season.

The news doesn’t come entirely as a surprise. While it continues to pull decent ratings, its viewership has been declining and fans have long complained about the creative decline of the series. Moreover, some of the key figures involved with Weeds have already begun moving on to other projects. Read more after the jump.

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Red Hour Films announced today that Wallace Shawn, Justin Kirk, Dan Stevens and Todd Barry are the latest actors cast in Clueless director Amy Heckerling‘s romantic horror-comedy Vamps. The film stars Alicia Silverstone and Krysten Ritter as two young female vampires living the good life in contemporary New York “until love enters the picture and each has to make a choice that will jeopardize their immortality.”

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WEEDS (season 5)

The previous three episodes of Weeds were the breeziest of the season and decidedly welcome after the brick-cold start. However, by now viewers are conditioned to expect another hellish crescendo to fall upon the resilient Botwins. It’s like dysfunctional clockwork. And these days, even the lighthearted eps dance inside an atmosphere of widespread murder and violent threat. So, before things get all gloomy again, let’s take a look at last week’s ep, “Van Nuys.” The ep introduced viewers to a bit of gross, titular, pregnancy-related slang courtesy of a very experienced Andy. It also marked the introduction of Dr. Audra Kitson, a seemingly open-minded, open-eared obstetrician, in a recurring guest role for Alanis Morissette (Dogma, movie theaters).

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WEEDS (season 5)

Two episodes deep into the fifth season of Weeds, let’s take a look at where Nancy Botwin is headed—it’s disturbing and bleak, and involves being forcibly bent over a table. And what of her dysfunctional brood? Spoilers ahead. /Film will consider posting regular Weeds wrap-ups if there is enough reader interest. Let us know.

Over the last three days, I’ve read complaints online from a number of Weeds viewers who feel that the second episode, “Machetes Up Top,” is simply too dark. To be honest, I’m surprised I haven’t come across more of these sentiments; but we’re now in the fifth season, and the majority of viewers who have stuck around expect such testy slaps. For many, pleasurable guilt is part of the show’s appeal: Weeds is famously a love/hate series in and outside the tube. Since its debut in 2005, the series has embraced the modern, twisted anti-hero, one named Nancy Botwin molded in the fresh and hot shape of a drug-peddling MILF. Four years later, the television landscape is peppered with all kinds of charming killers, drug-pushers, gluttons, and sex fiends. And for better or worse, Weeds has confronted the trend and its anti-hero competitors by playing likability limbo hardcore. In 2009, the show’s writers appear dead-set on subjecting her to masochistic, highly self-destructive behavior and situations. How low can a mom get.

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