Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: What better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? This week we dig into the ripple effect within Penn State’s football program circa the Sandusky era, revisit an arsonist, be inspired by the portrait of an artist as an old man, find out what being abandoned in the frozen tundra can do to a person, say hi again to Nathalie Fay, and get political for a couple of minutes in the Ukraine.

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Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: What better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? This week we get all kinds of Björk’d, revisit one weird road in Italy, spend the night with a Parisian, and wonder what in the world drives some people’s creative mojo.

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How to Shoot a Nightclub Scene Using Almost No Money

Layoverclub

This year at the Seattle International Film Festival, I saw a movie called Layover, which tells the story of how a young Parisian named Simone gets stuck in LA on an extended layover and ends up learning more about her hopes and dreams than she had anticipated. Not only was I impressed with the film, I also loved the story of how filmmaker Joshua Caldwell put it together for about $6,000. Layover is a testament to what can be accomplished with a solid script, a strong directorial eye, a single Canon 5D Mark II camera, and sheer willpower.

In fact, I enjoyed the film so much that (full disclosure) I signed on to become a producer for it. And starting today, /Film readers and /Filmcast listeners can download the film, DRM-free, for $5.95.

One thing that I found particularly impressive about the film was an intense scene that takes place at a nightclub with Simone and her friend. How did Caldwell shoot this scene on such a limited budget? After the jump, see Caldwell’s exclusive video explanation of how he filmed the nightclub scene, and read an interview I did with Caldwell and his collaborators.
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SIFF 2014: Making a Movie for $6,000

layoverphoto2

This weekend, I saw a movie at the Seattle International Film Festival that had a budget of $6,000. Joshua Caldwell’s Layover, which had its world premiere here, was shot in 11 days in Los Angeles and takes place during the course of a single evening, as a itinerant frenchwoman Simone (played by Nathalie Fay) re-connects with a friend from her past. Layover is a film in the tradition of Linklater’s Before series, and I found that it perfectly captured the paradox encountered by many a millenial: feeling trapped, while also realizing that the possibilities for your life are still endless. It’s a beautiful, moving, and wistful film.

But what goes into making a film with a budget that’s slightly more than the cost of the camera you’d need to shoot it on? I spoke with Caldwell about how he shot the film and why he went the low-budget route. Find our conversation after the jump, watch the film’s trailer, and be sure to check out the Indiegogo campaign for Caldwell’s next two films.
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