Full House reboot

Warner Bros. television is considering a possible reboot of Full House, the popular ABC television sitcom which ran 1987 to 1995. The reboot would bring the Tanner family back to television with new episodes which would even include some of the original cast. Learn more information about the Full House reboot after the jump.
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Chris Pratt Guardians of the Galaxy

You love Guardians of the Galaxy, we love Guardians of the Galaxy, pretty much everyone loves Guardians of the Galaxy. After a massive, massive opening weekend to go along with stellar reviews (currently 93% fresh on Rotten Tomatoes), the Guardians of the Galaxy have officially become a piece of popular culture. How do you cement that? You get celebrities behind the film.

Dozens and dozens of comedians, directors and various other famous people took to Twitter over the weekend to praise James Gunn‘s film and you can check out a bunch of their wildly positive Guardians of the Galaxy celebrity tweets below. Read More »

Full House on Jimmy Fallon

What a great time for ’90s nostalgia. The Backstreet Boys are touring again, crop tops are coming back into fashion, and Disney is going ahead with the Boy Meets World spinoff Girl Meets World. Now we also have reunions from the Seinfeld and Full House casts to look forward to.

While appearing on the WFAN show Boomer & Carton yesterday, Jerry Seinfeld confirmed that the “big, huge, gigantic” project he’s been working on with Larry David is indeed a Seinfeld reunion, as has been rumored. He declined to give details, however, saying only that Jason Alexander would play George Costanza, and that other characters from the show would also be involved.

Seinfeld said that the “secret project,” which he described as a “short-ish form” one-off, was neither a Super Bowl commercial nor a Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee episode — but that “it is not not those things, either.” Whatever it is, we shouldn’t have to wait long to see it, as Seinfeld also promised that it’d be released “very, very soon.” [Variety]

After the jump, the men of Full House, who’ve already re-teamed for an Super Bowl ad, tease a potential sequel with “a twist.”

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"Destroy Build Destroy"

From the start of the ’00s, musician and motivational speaker Andrew W.K. has been jumping around the planet promoting the benefits of partying the human heart out. So relentless is his dedication that he’s been consulted on the topic by entertainment zeitgeisters like Jackass, Conan O’Brien, and The Daily Show. His music and modus operandi were forever immortalized—in one of the first crossovers of then-nascent youth culture with the summer blockbuster—in Old School. As the decade closes out, 2009 finds Andrew W.K. overseeing one of the best major nightclubs in New York City, Santos Party House, a brand new record label, and…a new kids gameshow on Cartoon Network that entails firing bazookas and setting off enough C4 to make John McClane grind a roll of Tums.

Entitled Destroy Build Destroy, Andrew W.K. serves as a white-denim ringmaster on episodes pitting two demolition squads of barely-teens. Last weekend’s premiere saw a team of Mathletes take on a team of Skaters. Pass the safety goggles and get your awkward on. The show’s grandiose objective is to build massive machinery and Road Warrior-esque makeshift vehicles, throw down the gauntlet on a bizarre stunt course, and then blow up the losing team’s creation. Big time. As we discuss below, the show plays like Michael Bay 101, utilizing military tanks and firearms in a novel—arguably thought-provoking—positive means to an end. If you’ve never read an interview with Andrew W.K., caution: you may find yourself hypnotized by his “punk rock feng shui” philosophy, as if lost amongst flowing robes accented by a stream of signature blood in the name of fun.

Hunter Stephenson: Andrew, what do you make of the critics who already say that your show, Destroy Build Destroy, will lead to a kid being accidentally blown up?

Andrew W.K.: Well, that’s certainly always a concern when you’re presenting potentially hazardous situations to anybody. This could be a show about senior citizens and I’m sure there would almost be as much concern about them injuring themselves. Whenever you’re venturing into the exciting part of the world and want to present it, there tends to be risk there. But, I always have a lot confidence in the intelligence of young people to be safe, to do what they want to do. Just because there is someone out there who might end up hurting themselves doesn’t mean that everyone else needs to have all that excitement taken away. That’s how I’ve been thinking of it…

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full house movie

John Stamos, who played Uncle Jesse on the 1980′s-1990′s television sitcom Full House, says he’s developing a possible concept for a big screen Full House movie. Stamos told the New York Daily News that he’s “working on a movie idea, but it wouldn’t be us playing us.”

So I guess the concept is more of a remake or contemporary reimagining than a sequel. Stamos said that his idea “would probably take place in the first few years [of the series].” I doubt this idea will ever come into fruition, unless it’s a television movie which acts as a backdoor pilot for a new series.

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