Happy Christmas

The 2014 Sundance Film Festival hasn’t even officially began yet, but the first film is off the market. It’s Joe Swanberg‘s Happy Christmas, starring Anna Kendrick, Melanie Lynskey, Mark Webber and Lena Dunham. Magnolia Pictures and Paramount Pictures will co-distrubute with Magnolia handling U.S. theatrical and VOD wile Paramount will do home video and international. Read the full press release below. Read More »

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Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: What better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? This week we  talk about boobs, get lurid with our Instamatic, give some northerners a taste of sunshine, and set out to explain the ways of Vermeer with Teller.
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24-exposures-poster-header

The actors in Joe Swanberg‘s movies have, at times, been friends of his in filmmaking, just as he has acted in other directors’ films. For 24 Exposures, Swanberg has Adam Wingard and Simon Barrett in front of the lens — they’re the director/writer pair who are responsible for films such as You’re Next and A Horrible Way To Die, and parts of  V/H/S and V/H/S/2. (Swanberg has acted for Wingard before, in You’re Next, and they’ve acted for him in his segment for V/H/S.)

The plot is right out of a Euro-sleaze as “A fetish photographer and a homicide detective are brought together when a young model turns up dead.” Check out a trailer below. Read More »

 

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: What better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? This week we’re still tryin’ to make it Hollywood, become too smart for our own good, see faith in humanity restored inside Pakistan, and consider the beliefs of those we collectively call “crazy”.
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drinking-buddies-trailer

Joe Swanberg‘s new film Drinking Buddies is his most traditionally polished effort, but it still has the raw emotional intensity of his best ultra low budget work. The film features a great quartet: Anna Kendrick, Jake Johnson, Ron Livingston, and Olivia Wilde. The four actors play two committed couples, but lines between them are starting to blur as dissatisfaction with each is complicated by the friendship between Wilde and Johnson’s characters.

This first trailer seems like it gives away a lot, but this is really just a quick sketch of the plot. It hints at some of the most awkward moments between characters without getting into precisely what complications await as everyone tries to figure out what they really want. This is a movie that is frank about the difficulties of maintaining a relationship after the first blush of attraction fades, and while it isn’t always easy, there’s great stuff within, and Wilde’s performance should be appreciated as one of the best she’s given. Read More »

youre-next-trailer

Almost two years ago, Toronto Film Festival and Fantastic Fest audiences made a lot of noise about the bloody home-invasion thriller You’re Next. Now everyone gets to see what those few people were talking about.

Director Adam Wingard (A Horrible Way to Die, V/H/S) and screenwriter Simon Barrett (A Horrible Way to Die) have come up with a great spin on the hoary old home invasion movie, and populated it with a cast that is ready get dirty and bloody. Indie and genre faves (Sharni Vinson, AJ Bowen, Barbara Crampton, Amy Seimetz) and filmmakers (Joe SwanbergTi West) play members of a large family who come together for a celebration dinner at a relatively remote home in the country. The clan quickly finds that it has been targeted by masked assailants who have staked out the house with very violent intent.

A great use of Lou Reed’s song ‘Perfect Day’ helps this trailer establish and then build tension. By the end you might be as impatient for the August release of You’re Next as the film’s creators must be. Read More »

You're Next hallway

In 2011, one of the hits of TIFF and Fantastic Fest was Adam Wingard‘s home invasion thriller You’re Next. The film drew raves at just a couple of festival screenings and was snapped up by LionsGate. But rather than releasing the film quickly, the studio held on to it for a while. After appearing once at Fantastic Fest in September 2011, the film was dormant until just over a week ago, when it played at SXSW.

Now You’re Next has a release set for August 23 this year, and we’ve got the first wave of new promo materials for the film. The movie is built around a family reunion at a semi-remote mansion, and observes as a group of masked intruders attacks the family with murderous intent. The opening promo salvo is a set of teaser posters that show off the masks, and that give a sense of the dire atmosphere that pervades much of the film. Read More »

Horror movies are a dime a dozen. Good ones are much more valuable, and a good one just hit VOD today. It’s called V/H/S, and is an anthology film featuring creepy, gory segments from filmmakers Adam Wingard (You’re Next), Glenn McQuaid (I Sell The Dead), Radio Silence, David Bruckner (The Signal), Joe Swanberg (Hannah Takes the Stairs)and Ti West (The Innkeepers).

The premise is simple. A group of criminals are hired to break into a house and steal a secret VHS tape. Not knowing which specific tape is their target, they pop in several and are subjected to some seriously scary shit. Peter and I saw the film at Sundance, loved it, and now you can enjoy it on demand. Or, if you prefer, wait until it hits theaters October 5.

Either way, after the jump, we have an awesome 5-minute featurette on the making of the film. Read More »

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