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In Part 4 of our FilmAid broadcast, directors Jason Reitman and Bryan Singer join us to discuss their formative cinematic experiences, what a Reitman-directed Ghostbusters film would look like, what it’s like to plan the next X-Men film, and why Jason is doing live reads these days.

If you want to support the cause we’re promoting, please head over to filmaid.org/slashfilm and donate! You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993.
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Jason Reitman

Briefly: Good news for anyone anticipating Jason Reitman‘s latest film, Labor Day. Paramount has enough confidence in it to give the film a date primed for awards consideration. Labor Day will be released Christmas Day, expand on January 10 then go wide January 31.

Labor Day Gattlin Griffith as a young boy whose life is turned upside down when his single mother (Kate Winslet) aids an escaped convict (Josh Brolin). Reitman adapted the screenplay from a Joyce Maynard novel and it co-stars Tobey Maguire, J.K. Simmons and James Van Der Beek. [Deadline]

PAIN AND GAIN

It’s that time of year again. We’re in Las Vegas at CinemaCon, an industry-only convention (formerly called ShoWest) for movie theater owners and distributors. The Hollywood studios come here each year with their biggest stars and clips from upcoming films, hoping to impress the theater owners into booking their “products” in the coming year. For example, last year we saw footage from films that were in production and weren’t set to be released until late 2013. Some studios also present unfinished cuts of their films super-early. This year Pixar is screening Monsters University, for example.

The opening night of CinemaCon 2013 featured a presentation by Paramount Pictures. They screened a reel with brief clips from a ton of upcoming films including Darren Aroofsky’s Noah and Jason Reitman’s Labor Day. They also presented 18 minutes of Star Trek Into Darkness in 3D, three clips from World War Z, and Michael Bay premiered his film Pain & Gain. After the jump you will be able to read my first reaction to Bay’s latest, along with a video blog I recorded with Alex from FirstShowing giving our thoughts about everything screened.
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reitman_johnson

This past weekend, the /Filmcast held its 10-hour marathon podcast benefiting FilmAid. It was an action packed affair featuring long segments with many of the most popular filmmakers in Hollywood today. We had appearances from Rian Johnson (Looper), Jason Reitman (Up in the Air), David Wain (Wet Hot American Summer), Damon Lindelof (Lost), Bryan Singer (X-Men: Days of Future Past), Edgar Wright (Scott Pilgrim vs. the World), Jon M. Chu (G.I. Joe Retaliation) and more.

Over the course of the broadcast (which you can read more about here; check back soon for downloadable segments) many of those filmmakers provided juicy, newsy tidbits. You can read them after the jump, including Rian Johnson’s thoughts on the new season of Breaking Bad, Jason Reitman’s almost-foray into the X-Men universe and when we can expect to see the trailer for Edgar Wright’s The World End. Read More »

Usual Suspects

For Jason Reitman‘s final live read of the 2012-2013 season, he chose a revered, Oscar-winning screenplay: Christopher McQuarrie‘s The Usual Suspects. When that title was announced I was initially skeptical. I thought, “The Usual Suspects is so well known for its surprise ending, and that ending is so incredibly visual, how would it come across in a live read setting?” The answer was revealed in two ways. First this read suggests that Bryan Singer‘s direction in the original film is powerful and underrated. Also, as great as the ending to McQuarrie’s script is, some of his true poetry isn’t even on the screen.

Presented by Film Independent at LACMA, read more about the star-studded cast (which included Dexter‘s Michael C. Hall, The League‘s Mark Duplass and original cast member Kevin Pollak) below. Read More »

The stage at the Wadsworth Theater in Westwood, California seems average enough. With its run down seats, bland walls and single stall bathrooms, it could double for any average high school auditorium. There’s nothing spectacular about it. Except on this Monday morning.

On this Monday morning, Steve Carell and Steve Buscemi are flying through the air on harnesses sporting long blond hair and bedazzled purple velour jumpsuits. They land on the stage, introduce themselves as magicians Burt Wonderstone and Anton Marvelton and proceed to dance about like a couple of old men whose best days are way past them. And that’s exactly what they are.

It’s February 6, 2012, day 21 of 48 on the set of Don Scardino’s March comedy The Incredible Burt Wonderstone. The film, set in the world of professional magic, is the story of two magicians (Carell and Buscemi) who are long-time partners. Split after years of working together, they’re forced back together when another magician (played by Jim Carrey) begins to steal their spotlight and relevance. It’s a return to physical comedy for Carrey, the feature directorial debut of TV vet Scardino, and a role that seems right in the wheelhouse of the lovable, hilarious Carell, also a producer.

Co-starring Olivia Wilde, James Gandolfini, Alan Arkin and more, the film is scheduled for release March 15 and we were on set to capture some of the magic, as it were. Read More »

Maybe it was David Mamet‘s script. Maybe it was Jason Reitman‘s casting. Most likely it was a combination of both, but the latest live read at Los Angeles County Museum of Art was the stuff of legend. Six women – Mae Whitman, Carla Gugino, Robin Wright, Catherine O’Hara, Melanie Lynskey and Maria Belloreading the screenplay for Glengarry Glen Ross was the perfect mix of material, personality, chemistry, and energy. Add a certain je ne sais quoi, and the great script and event concept became something truly special.

Presented as part of the Film Independent at LACMA Film Series, the Glengarry Glen Ross live read was, unfortunately, a one-time-only event. But below, I’ll do my best to explain how each actress expertly inhabited their character, simply sitting on a stage with a script and a music stand. Read More »

Jason Reitman has once again decided to completely flip the cast for his February Live Read, presented by Film Independent at LACMA. This time around, the film is Glengarry Glen Ross. Best known as a 1992 movie starring Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Alec Baldwin and Ed Harris, Glengarry Glen Ross is based on a Pulitzer Prize winning play by David Mamet. Mamet adapted the screenplay for the film and that script is what Reitman’s Live Read will be based on.

The twist, though, is that he’s doing it with an all-female cast. The ladies will A – always, B- be, C- closing on February 21 in Los Angeles. Read the cast below. Read More »

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