LOL: Quentin Tarantino’s Trunk Shot

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If you’ve seen more than one movie by Quentin Tarantino, then you’ve surely noticed his signature POV trunk shot. The shot even has its own wikipedia page (take that Scorsese Squeeze!). Here is the background from wiki:

The Trunk shot is a camera angle used in cinema when one or more characters need to retrieve something or someone from the trunk of a car. …  This camera angle is often noted to be the trademark of film maker Quentin Tarantino who disputes that he puts the shot in his films as a trademark and simply asks “Where would you put the camera?” Although he did not invent it, Tarantino popularized the trunk shot, which is featured in Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown, and Kill Bill. In Death Proof, Tarantino’s traditional shot looking up at the actors from the trunk of a car is replaced by one looking up from under the hood. In Inglourious Basterds a “trunk shot” is used two times when Aldo Raine (Brad Pitt) crouches over a captured Nazi with one of his soldiers, cutting a swastika into their victim’s forehead (the shot is supposed to be the victim’s point of view).

After the jump you can see an image that collects all of Tarantino’s Trunk Shots. It first appeared on Reddit but has been making its way around the interwebs yesterday.

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The following introduction and interview contain moderate spoilers.

When a new film from Quentin Tarantino is released, a film as original and awash in genre-geometry as Inglourious Basterds, the post-viewing sensation that follows remains difficult to describe. In Kill Bill Vol. 1, there is a scene set inside the House of Blue Leaves in which Uma Thurman’s Bride blinks and the film switches from black and white to color. A sizable light switch is then thrown by a yakuza. In seconds, the screen turns a cool midnight blue. At that moment the aural equivalent of digital goosebumps chimes unusually through the speakers. Now everything on screen appears the same but is different, renergized and alive. I remember watching this scene and realizing that it inexplicably captures how I feel after a QT film; the difference being that the sensation of a QT film is not flicked instantaneously; it spreads over the following weeks and months as if by a potent time-release capsule. In addition, as this sensation is occuring at a personal level, Tarantino’s characters and images are similarly infiltrating and titillating the collective mind of endless media, fellow cinephiles, and general moviegoers. Pop-culture synapses connect further until a single Tarantino character is loaded into the permanent highlight reel of a respective year, for film or otherwise. It’s the lysergic, symbiotic propaganda of a true genius.

In this way, Inglourious Basterds is no different from Tarantino’s superlative works: the character that will be remembered in bold fashion is Colonel Hans Landa aka The Jew Hunter, the primary villain in Basterds. Moreover, international viewers, and American viewers especially, will come to remember their surprise introduction to the masterful talent embodying Landa, the Austrian actor Christoph Waltz. His career spanning some 30 years, primarily in theatre and television, Waltz’s performance as the erudite, calculating, and predatory Nazi colonel—a fictional Tarantino creation—is all but guaranteed a Best Supporting Actor nomination. This /Film staffer predicts “a bingo.” If a timely parallel need be drawn to exemplify the breakout performance by this veteran actor—a role that plants the seeds for a long, prosperous career—it would be that of Jackie Earle Haley in Little Children. During his whirlwind of publicity, Quentin Tarantino, doting even for Tarantino, has praised Waltz and his character with the following…

“You gave me my movie.” – to Waltz at the Cannes Film Festival, where he won Best Actor

“Hans Landa is one of the greatest characters I have ever written, and one of the greatest characters that I will ever write.”

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Cool Stuff: Robert De Niro Times Six Print

denirotimessixIn January, Nakatomiinc released an awesome print by Tim Doyle, which was an homage to Bill Murray‘s many great roles. The print sold out fast, and doyle began work on the second in the series: Robert De Niro Times Six which takes a look at  the many characters that Robert has played over his career: Godfather 2, Taxi Driver, Deer Hunter, Raging Bull, The Untouchables, and Jackie Brown. The print is extremely widescreen (as seen after the jump), 6 inches high by 36 wide, 4 colors, printed by D and L.  Signed and Numbered. Nakatomiinc is selling two different editions, a regular edition (shown after the jump) for $30 (only 150 prints) and a Glow in the dark Blue Variant (shown above) for $50 (only 25 prints).

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Cool Stuff: Tarantino Babies T-Shirt

Last week we featured Dutch Southern’s Hope for a Better Tomorrow T-Shirt in Cool Stuff. But Blair Sayer’s Tarantino Babies t-shirt is just as cool. Featuring a design which is inspired by the idea “What if Quentin Tarantino directed Muppet Babies”. Screen printed on an American Apparel olive t-shirt for just $18 on DutchSouthern.com.

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An eleven year old phone conversation between Harvey Weinstein and Quentin Tarantino has leaked out to the press. Apparently Robert De Niro believed he should be getting more money for starring in Tarantino’s Jackie Brown. In the phone call, Weinstein warns Tarantino that Robert De Niro might give him a late midnight phone call. Tarantino responds: “Tell Bob not to call me yelling and screaming because I don’t know if I’m going to be nice [if] the guy calls up yelling and screaming at me like a maniac, calling me a [beep]er!”

Weinstein explains “He thinks he’s going to make John Travolta look like that was an amateur night in Dixie.” Also coming to the actor’s defence: “This is a great actor and actually a great guy, who’s going through a difficult time. I think he’s really having like a scratching-his-head session, you know, with his own life and his own career.

I’m not sure what this whole phone call is supposed to prove. What? That De Niro got angry when he didn’t get offered the money that he believed he deserved? Regardless, it is fascinating to listen in on a conversation between an A-list director and a top Hollywood mogul, where you hear things like “are you prepared to go up a million on that?”

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