Lionsgate and Miramax are teaming up to celebrate the first 20 years of Quentin Tarantino‘s career with an ten-disc blu-ray box set featuring Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown, True Romance, the two Kill Bill films, Death ProofInglourious Basterds, and new supplemental material.

The bad news is that, with the exception of the two discs of supplemental material, it looks like this is a collection of the existing catalog releases of each film. So if you’ve already got all or most of these Blu releases, there’s not much incentive to buy. The good news is that if you don’t have those releases, this is a great one-stop way to get Tarantino’s major work on disc. Read More »

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Quentin Tarantino has been pretty vocal that many of his films are set in the same universe. Vincent Vega from Pulp Fiction is the documented brother of Vic Vega in Reservoir Dogs. Mr. White in Reservoir Dogs possibly worked with Alabama from True Romance. Brands such as Big Kahuna Burger and Red Apple Cigarettes appear in multiple films, the list goes on an on. A more recent development was when Tarantino said that Sgt. Donny Donowitz, the Bear Jew of Inglourious Basterds, was the father of Lee Donowitz, the sleazy movie producer of True Romance.

And that got one person thinking. If all these movies take place in the same universe, that means World War II ended how it ended in Inglourious Basterds and everyone would know about it. Which opens up a huge can of worms. Read the very entertaining theory below. Read More »

Ty Burrell has had a pretty great career trajectory: he went from being a bit player in Black Hawk Down to (very effectively) acting like a total dickhead in Zack Snyder’s Dawn of the Dead remake to being a core part of one of the most praised shows on TV, Modern Family.

Now the recent Emmy winner will be in Dan Schechter‘s Switch, which is effectively a prequel to Quentin Tarantino’s Jackie Brown. Read More »

Yesterday, artist Tim Doyle took you through his thought process for the first four in a series of seven prints he created for the Spoke Art Quentin vs. Coens show opening at the Bold Hype Gallery in New York next week. You can read his write ups for Reservoir Dogs, both Kill Bills and Death Proof by clicking here. Today, Doyle discusses Inglourious Basterds and exclusively reveals Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown. These prints will first be available April 7 at the opening of the show in New York. Get all the info and see full images after the jump. Read More »

A couple weeks back, we posted the schedule for the Alamo Drafthouse’s 2010 Rolling Road Show. The traveling movie screening series just one of the many reasons the Alamo Drafthouse is the greatest movie theater on the planet. For those who don’t know, the Drafthouse travels around the United States to present one-time-only screenings of classic films using a portable movie theater which they set-up in famous locations from the films. This year’s line-up includes Jackie Brown, Dirty Harry, There Will Be Blood, Convoy, The Blues Brothers, Robocop, Rocky I-III, On The Waterfront, and The Godfather Part II. Earlier this week we posted about Olly Moss’ awesome posters for the film series.

The Drafthouse has just informed us of a big location change for their first event, Jackie Brown in Los Angeles this Friday. Find out the details after the jump.

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A couple weeks back, we posted the schedule for the Alamo Drafthouse’s 2010 Rolling Road Show. The traveling movie screening series just one of the many reasons the Alamo Drafthouse is the greatest movie theater on the planet. For those who don’t know, the Drafthouse travels around the United States to present one-time-only screenings of classic films using a portable movie theater which they set-up in famous locations from the films. This year’s line-up includes Jackie Brown, Dirty Harry, There Will Be Blood, Convoy, The Blues Brothers, Robocop, Rocky I-III, On The Waterfront, and The Godfather Part II.

To promote each of the screenings, Alamo has commissioned UK artist Olly Moss to create posters for each of the screenings. We’ve featured Moss many times on the site in the past (Locke inspired Lost poster and t-shirt, The Evil Dead Poster), and is probably best known for his popular t-shirt designs which have spread across the interwebs (the Spoilers t-shirt and a series of retro movie poster remakes that we previously featured in Cool Stuff, and Shoot The Baddies). Hit the jump to see Moss’ awesome designs for the Rolling Roadshow films, along with more information about the upcoming events.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

LOL: Quentin Tarantino’s Trunk Shot

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If you’ve seen more than one movie by Quentin Tarantino, then you’ve surely noticed his signature POV trunk shot. The shot even has its own wikipedia page (take that Scorsese Squeeze!). Here is the background from wiki:

The Trunk shot is a camera angle used in cinema when one or more characters need to retrieve something or someone from the trunk of a car. …  This camera angle is often noted to be the trademark of film maker Quentin Tarantino who disputes that he puts the shot in his films as a trademark and simply asks “Where would you put the camera?” Although he did not invent it, Tarantino popularized the trunk shot, which is featured in Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown, and Kill Bill. In Death Proof, Tarantino’s traditional shot looking up at the actors from the trunk of a car is replaced by one looking up from under the hood. In Inglourious Basterds a “trunk shot” is used two times when Aldo Raine (Brad Pitt) crouches over a captured Nazi with one of his soldiers, cutting a swastika into their victim’s forehead (the shot is supposed to be the victim’s point of view).

After the jump you can see an image that collects all of Tarantino’s Trunk Shots. It first appeared on Reddit but has been making its way around the interwebs yesterday.

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The following introduction and interview contain moderate spoilers.

When a new film from Quentin Tarantino is released, a film as original and awash in genre-geometry as Inglourious Basterds, the post-viewing sensation that follows remains difficult to describe. In Kill Bill Vol. 1, there is a scene set inside the House of Blue Leaves in which Uma Thurman’s Bride blinks and the film switches from black and white to color. A sizable light switch is then thrown by a yakuza. In seconds, the screen turns a cool midnight blue. At that moment the aural equivalent of digital goosebumps chimes unusually through the speakers. Now everything on screen appears the same but is different, renergized and alive. I remember watching this scene and realizing that it inexplicably captures how I feel after a QT film; the difference being that the sensation of a QT film is not flicked instantaneously; it spreads over the following weeks and months as if by a potent time-release capsule. In addition, as this sensation is occuring at a personal level, Tarantino’s characters and images are similarly infiltrating and titillating the collective mind of endless media, fellow cinephiles, and general moviegoers. Pop-culture synapses connect further until a single Tarantino character is loaded into the permanent highlight reel of a respective year, for film or otherwise. It’s the lysergic, symbiotic propaganda of a true genius.

In this way, Inglourious Basterds is no different from Tarantino’s superlative works: the character that will be remembered in bold fashion is Colonel Hans Landa aka The Jew Hunter, the primary villain in Basterds. Moreover, international viewers, and American viewers especially, will come to remember their surprise introduction to the masterful talent embodying Landa, the Austrian actor Christoph Waltz. His career spanning some 30 years, primarily in theatre and television, Waltz’s performance as the erudite, calculating, and predatory Nazi colonel—a fictional Tarantino creation—is all but guaranteed a Best Supporting Actor nomination. This /Film staffer predicts “a bingo.” If a timely parallel need be drawn to exemplify the breakout performance by this veteran actor—a role that plants the seeds for a long, prosperous career—it would be that of Jackie Earle Haley in Little Children. During his whirlwind of publicity, Quentin Tarantino, doting even for Tarantino, has praised Waltz and his character with the following…

“You gave me my movie.” – to Waltz at the Cannes Film Festival, where he won Best Actor

“Hans Landa is one of the greatest characters I have ever written, and one of the greatest characters that I will ever write.”

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Cool Stuff: Robert De Niro Times Six Print

denirotimessixIn January, Nakatomiinc released an awesome print by Tim Doyle, which was an homage to Bill Murray‘s many great roles. The print sold out fast, and doyle began work on the second in the series: Robert De Niro Times Six which takes a look at  the many characters that Robert has played over his career: Godfather 2, Taxi Driver, Deer Hunter, Raging Bull, The Untouchables, and Jackie Brown. The print is extremely widescreen (as seen after the jump), 6 inches high by 36 wide, 4 colors, printed by D and L.  Signed and Numbered. Nakatomiinc is selling two different editions, a regular edition (shown after the jump) for $30 (only 150 prints) and a Glow in the dark Blue Variant (shown above) for $50 (only 25 prints).

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