It Comes at Night

(Welcome to Now Stream This, a column dedicated to the best movies streaming on Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, and every other streaming service out there.) 

The end of the year is upon us. What better way to kick 2017 to the curb and usher in 2018 than by watching a whole bunch of movies? Blow off your dumb New Year’s Eve party – who wants to be social? Instead, hunker down under some blankets as the icy, cold wind howls outside and take in the following films until the mess that was 2017 is finally over once and for all.

This latest edition of Now Stream This features a Vertigo-like mystery, an end-of-the-world fable, a hypnotic blend of documentary and narrative storytelling, puppets having sex, a grindhouse throwback, and more! Here are the best movies streaming right now! Let’s get streaming, folks – and have a happy New Year.

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The Most Underrated Movies of 2017

alien has run its course

There were many great films in 2017, and while most of these movies find themselves embraced as the end of the year rolls around, a few have slipped through the cracks. The following list will attempt to give these forgotten films their due, and also shine a light on some of 2017’s most interesting, challenging films that audiences (and sometimes critics) ultimately rejected. These are the Most Underrated Movies of 2017.

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The Best Movie Trailers of 2017

Best Movie Trailers of 2017

As 2017 comes to a close, it’s time to look back at some of the best movie marketing of the year. Yes, trailers are literally just commercials for products, but the very best trailers can be an art form unto themselves. When studios and editors buck the trends and set out to create something that truly stands out from the pack, it can make for something worth celebrating. So let’s talk about the Best Movie Trailers of 2017.

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/Film’s 28 Favorite Movies of 2017 So Far

war for the planet of the apes ceasar and his apes

Over the past few weeks, the /Film team has assembled personal lists of their favorite movies of the year so far, a look at where we stand halfway through the year. But those lists were also ballots, votes for one final article – a complete list of the entire site’s favorite movies of 2017 so far.

Of those six ballots (and 60 possible slots) contributed by Peter Sciretta, Jacob Hall, Ethan Anderton, Jack Giroux, Hoai-Tran Bui, and Ben Pearson, 28 films were named. And that brings us to the grand finale: the 28 best movies /Film has seen in the first half of this year.

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Jacob Hall’s Top 10 Movies of 2017 So Far

get out

(With 2017 halfway over, the /Film staff will be spending this week compiling lists of the best movies they’ve seen this year. In order to be eligible for the list, a film they’ve seen simply has to have a 2017 release date, even if they saw it at a festival or early screening. Here are Jacob Hall’s top 10 movies of 2017 so far.)

On the cinematic front, 2017 has been a year of mixed blessings. In terms of sheer number of good movies, we’re already trailing 2016 quite a bit. But the movies that are good? Man, the first half of this year has given us some real treasures.

Before we dive into my top 10 of 2017 so far, here’s what didn’t make the list. Logan, while very good and present on several of my colleagues’ list, missed the cut. As did two other superhero movies I enjoyed very much, Spider-Man: Homecoming and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. The biggest runner-up here is Atomic Blonde, which I loved at SXSW and occupied spot number 10 until the literal last minute.

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Jack Giroux’s Top 10 Movies of 2017 So Far

Jack Giroux's Top 10 Movies of 2017 So Far

(With 2017 halfway over, the /Film staff will be spending this week compiling lists of the best movies they’ve seen this year. In order to be eligible for the list, a film they’ve seen simply has to have a 2017 release date, even if they saw it at a festival or early screening. Here are Jack Giroux’s top 10 movies of 2017 so far.)

So far, this has been a good year at the movies, especially the last two weeks. The BeguiledOkjaBaby Driver, and a film I regrettably haven’t seen yet but have heard nothing but love for, The Big Sick, all came out and have kept us busy watching movies. Throughout 2017, we’ve been treated to a variety of good films, including a few standout crime stories and superhero movies. Here are my top 10 movies of 2017 so far.

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Hoai-Tran Bui’s Top 10 Movies of 2017 So Far

top 10 movies of 2017

(With 2017 halfway over, the /Film staff will be spending this week compiling lists of the best movies they’ve seen this year. In order to be eligible for the list, a film they’ve seen simply has to have a 2017 release date, even if they saw it at a festival or early screening. Here are Hoai-Tran Bui’s top 10 movies of 2017 so far.)

When tasked with compiling my favorite movies of the year so far, I’ll admit that I had to wrack my brains a bit for ones that stood out from the crowd. Outside of Logan and Get Out, had there really been any standouts? But even though summer movie season had gotten off to a tepid start and studio offerings have been lackluster, I think it would be rash to say that 2017 has been a weak year for great movies. In fact, I think it’s quite the opposite: 2017 so far has offered an exciting array of captivating films in both the indie and genre circuit that gives me hope in an increasingly homogeneous movie industry. So much hope that my struggle to initially fill this list ended up being a struggle to narrow it down. (Sorry, The Beguiled and War for the Planet of the Apes, you almost made the cut.)

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it comes at night spoiler review

Trey Edward Shults’ It Comes At Night opens today and while it’s not the movie being sold in the trailers, it’s an exceptional piece of work. Tense and unsettling and bleaker than bleak, it’s going to rattle nerves of audiences everywhere this weekend. And everyone who sees it is probably going to have a lot to talk about.

Alex Riviello and Jacob Hall certainly did. Unable to get the film out of their minds, the two of them sat down to talk about the movie in spoiler-filled detail.

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It Comes at Night misleading trailer

(Welcome to The Soapbox, the space where we get loud, feisty, and opinionated about something that makes us very happy…or fills us with indescribable rage. In this edition: the excellent marketing for It Comes at Night is doing the movie a disservice.)

The trailers for It Comes at Night have been magnificent and the folks at A24 (or whoever they employed to edit them) should be commended. Each preview has evoked a menace and a terror rarely found in horror movie marketing. I have watched as that trailer made entire audiences grow tense. I have felt my wife, a huge horror fan, nudge me in the side, her non-verbal way of saying “take me to see that, please.”

Removed from the trailers, It Comes at Night is an excellent movie and writer/director Trey Edward Shults, his cast, and his crew should also be commended. In a summer filled with bombastic blockbusters, it’s a disturbing, patient, and upsetting experience that crawls under your skin and festers. It’s the kind of movie that will find an audience – people who will want to talk about it for some time to come.

But here’s the thing: It Comes at Night, while certainly worth your time and money, is not the movie A24 is selling. At all. In any way. And that’s not going to sit well with some audiences.

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it comes at night trailer

It Comes at Night opens this week and it brings a blast of unsettling, arthouse horror into the stifling summer movie season. Well, “blast” may not be the right word – this is a patient, uneasy, and downright creepy movie that deliberately avoids offering instant satisfaction or clear answers. This approach only makes the film more upsetting.

And writer/director Trey Edward Shults wouldn’t have it any other way. Like his previous film, the micro-budgeted drama Krisha, Shults has made a very personal film here, albeit one set in the post-apocalypse that follows two families sharing one roof in the woods while a virus destroys civilization elsewhere. Speaking with Shults, he was open about his influences (everyone from Stanley Kubrick to John Cassavetes), writing a horror movie as therapy, and plunging the audience into a nightmare.

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