These days, animation isn’t as defined by age as it once was. Once upon a time, a Disney movie was only thought to be for kids. But recently, Pixar has tackled mature themes, the humor of South Park has become a cultural institution, Star Wars is an animated TV series, comic book characters have cartoons and thanks to genres like anime, R-rated animation isn’t an oxymoron.

Enter Justin White, an up and coming artist made popular through sites like Threadless. He’s decided to take that thought one step further and turn some of your favorite live action movies and TV shows in to animation. His first solo show is called Rated G and opens at Gallery 1988 Melrose, in Los Angeles on Friday. We’re proud to exclusively the entire show.

White’s familiar yet flithy animated style has reimagined scenes from 30 films and shows never meant for animation. Films like Fight Club, Fargo, Casablanca, The Breakfast Club, Oldboy, Kindergarden Cop, Alien, Reservoir Dogs, There Will Be Blood and a whole lot more have been reimagined as high quality animation cels. He even tackled TV shows like Community, The Office, Breaking Bad and more.

After the jump check out all 30 images from the show and find out when and how you can grab them. Read More »

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“Damn.”

Let’s hope this isn’t a sign of things to come in regards to the Academy Awards for Paul Thomas Anderson‘s There Will Be Blood: Jonny Greenwood‘s feted instrumental soundtrack for the film, seen as a shoe-in for Best Original Score, has been officially disqualified. The reason? The score contains preexisting music. Red Carpet District reports that Greenwood’s score contains “35 minutes of original recordings and roughly 46 minutes of pre-existing work (including selections from the works of Arvo Pärt, as well as pieces in the public domain, such as Johannes Brahms’ “Concerto in D Major”).  Peripheral augmentation to the score included sporadic but minimal useage (15 minutes) of the artist’s 2006 composition “Popcorn Superhet Receiver.”

While I downloaded the soundtrack and admire it, I admit that the above details regarding source material eluded me. Rules are rules; even though I’m sure some die-hard Radiohead and PTA fans can’t be talked into coming down from their anger trees right now. What’s more surprising is the supreme suddenness of the Academy’s announcement, with Greenwood learning the decision via an official letter on January 17th, and the studio, Paramount Vantage, two days later. In comparison, Paramount Vantage says they learned that the soundtrack for their Into the Wild was also ineligible (due to  predominant use of songs) much further in advance. And it sounds as if the studio would have appealed the TWBB decision if they had the proper time.

Right when the impossibly important category starts to attract the attention and interest of a younger demographic, poof! Maybe it’s time to reinstate the “Adaptation and Song Scores” category, which has been off the ballots since 1984?

    Source Link: Variety /LAT

AFI’s Top 10 Movies of 2007

AFI Top 10

On Saturday, the American Film Institute picked its Top Ten American Films of 2007. The list is available below in alphabetical order:

  • Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead
  • The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
  • Into the Wild
  • Juno
  • Knocked Up
  • Michael Clayton
  • No Country for Old Men
  • Ratatouille
  • The Savages
  • There Will Be Blood

I tend to agree with this list more than I agreed with the Golden Globe nominations. I’m not sure if “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead” deserves to be up there, and while The Savages is a great movie, I’m not sure if it deserves to be in the top 10. Fox Searchlight’s Once would have been my choice. errr I forgot the AFI list only includes American films. I’m glad to see that AFI included my favorite comedies of the year: Juno and Knocked Up. And why has everyone forgotten about David Fincher’s Zodiac?

Here are AFI’s Top 10 lists from the last six years:

  • 2006: Babel, Borat, The Devil Wears Prada, Dreamgirls, Half Nelson, Happy Feet, Inside Man, Letters From Iwo Jima, Little Miss Sunshine, United 93.
  • 2005: Brokeback Mountain, Capote, Crash, The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Good Night And Good Luck, A History of Violence, King Kong, Munich, The Squid and the Whale, Syriana.
  • 2004: The Aviator, Collateral, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Friday Night Lights, The Incredibles, Kinsey, Maria Full of Grace, Million Dollar Baby, Sideways, Spider-Man 2
  • 2003: American Splendor, Finding Nemo, The Human Stain, In America, The Last Samurai, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, Lost in Translation, Master and Commander, Monster, Mystic River
  • 2002: About a Boy, About Schmidt, Adaptation, Antwone Fisher, Chicago, Frida, Gangs of New York, The Hours, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The Quiet American
  • 2001: A Beautiful Mind, Black Hawk Down, In The Bedroom, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Man Who Wasn’t There, Memento, Monster’s Ball, Moulin Rouge, Muholland Drive, Shrek
  • 2000: Almost Famous, Before Night Falls, Best In Show, Erin Brockovich, Gladiator, High Fidelity, Requiem For A Dream, Traffic, Wonder Boys, You Can Count on Me.

Interview: Into The Wild star Emile Hirsch

Into The Wild

At the Toronto Film Festival, we had the opportunity to interview Emile Hirsch about his new film Into The Wild. Sean Penn’s new film adaptation is is one of the best movies of 2007 so far. If the movie is in your city this week, go see it (it expands nationwide in the coming weeks).

Question: What do you think Christopher McCandless would think of this film?

Emile Hirsch: I think he’d be pretty excited about it and the effect it could have on people in a positive way. He’s a person from everything I’ve learned, was a person of action who wanted change. He’s a person who studied humanitarian things. Even in high school, he was so concerned with apartheids. Anything that he thinks can help change the bigger picture, I think he would think is a good thing. And his sister Carine has verified that.

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TIFF Movie Review: Into The Wild

Into The Wild

Based on the bestselling book by Jon Krakauer, Into The Wild tells the true story of Christopher McCandless, a college graduate who one day decides to emancipate himself from his family and the material word. He leaves all his possessions, giving his entire $24,000 savings account to charity and hitchhiked his way across the America, with a dream to live alone in the wilderness of Alaska.

Read More »

Toronto Film Festival LogoToday I finally found some time to sit down and sift through the 352 official selections of the 2007 Toronto Film Festival. Many hours later, I present to you 65 must see movies at the Toronto International Film Festival. I did the work so that you don’t have to. So why should you care about these films if you’re not making the trip up to Canada in September?

In 1998, Variety acknowledged that the Toronto International Film Festival “is second only to Cannes in terms of high-profile pics, stars and market activity.” Roger Ebert has also said that “although Cannes is still larger, Toronto is more useful and more important….”

Toronto is essentially a preview of which Independent to mid-sized film releases might be big in the next five months. The festival is considered a launch pad for many studios to begin “Oscar-buzz” for their films.

How do I know that you should see these movies? Well, in most cases I don’t. I have seen some press screenings of a couple of the films listed below (Valley of Elah, My Kid Could Paint That…) and can personally recommend them. But for the most part, I have no idea. I have cobbled this list from an exhaustive day of research. Some of the films I chose because of the director, writer, or cast. Others because of the plot synopsis.

When a review was available, I read it. If a trailer was available, I watched it. I’ve included films that were recommended to me by trusted friends. Some films that I missed but were highly reviewed at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival (Son of Rambow, The Savages).

I must offer this disclaimer: I tend to be attracted to American, British and Japanese cinema to a fault. I do have a handful of picks outside my comfort realm, but if you’re looking for more “Worldly” selections, you might have to look elsewhere.

It should also be noted that some of the films (especially in the Gala and special presentation sections) will hit theaters within the next two months. Some films even hit theaters days within the festival’s conclusion. I put these movies on the list because they are movies of interest. But you, like me, might want to hold off on some of these flicks until they hit your city next month. For me, there are some films that I won’t be able to resist like Across The Universe and No Country for Old Men. I know they come out sooner rather than later, but I need to see them sooner. I’ve noted the release dates of films that are opening in the next two months, just so you have that information.

I’ll be at the festival for nine and a half days, so chances are, I won’t be able to see all of these films. The reality is, I won’t see even half of these films. I’ll be doing some interviews, so I’ve lowered my goal to around 30 movies, which most people would still consider extreme (that’s at least three movies each day of the festival).

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Sean Penn’s Into the Wild Movie Trailer

 Into the Wild

Many of you probably know Sean Penn as an actor, but he’s been directing flicks since 1991. His latest, Into the Wild stars Emile Hirsch as a young, idealistic kid who abandons life as most of us know it for the Alaskan wilderness. Based on the bestseller by Jon Krakauer, and inspired by a true story. The movie also stars Vince Vaughn, Catherine Keener, Kristen Stewart, William Hurt, and Marcia Gay Harden. Check out the trailer after the jump.
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