Robin Williams Hook

Even when I didn’t think about it, Robin Williams was always a part of my life. His work was simply a part of everything that made me a person. Whether it was sneaking a peak at Comic Relief on HBO, watching old Mork and Mindy reruns after school, or catching the movies of the early nineties that turned him into a mega-star, Robin Williams was always a constant. If I needed to laugh, sing, be brought to tears or cringe uncontrollably, Williams was the man for the job.

He’s gone now, dead at the age of 63 from an apparent suicide, and it’s a horrible case of “you don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone.” I’m filled with emotion. I’m mad, I’m sad, I want to cry. But then I start to think about Williams’ legacy, his films, and what they mean to me, and I feel some comfort. Let’s take a look back at my favorite Robin Williams movies, and more specifically, performances.
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Hook remake

As someone who grew up in the Nineties, it’s kind of hard to get my mind around Nineties nostalgia. It honestly feels like it was yesterday, even though we’re 15 plus years removed. That said, I still enjoy it and Cinefix has just created a prime example to stab me straight in the heart – a homemade Hook remake.

They got Dante Basco to reprise his role as Rufio in a short, “homemade” (basically sweded) scene from Steven Spielberg‘s Hook. It’s surreal and funny to see this exciting, emotional scene played out in a Los Angeles driveway. With Basco there to utter his classic lines, however, it’s very worth your time. Plus there’s a behind the scenes video and a side by side with Spielberg’s version. Check them out below. Read More »

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Earlier today we were talking about the anniversary of Jurassic Park, released on this day in 1993. But in mid-1990, director Steven Spielberg wasn’t yet set to film Michael Chrichton’s novel, which hadn’t been released. Having made Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Spielberg had grown up a bit with the romance Always, released six months after the third Indy picture, and was poised to take over another film related to growing up: 1991′s Hook.

So this 1990 interview catches Spielberg in what looks now like a transitional phase, before the staggering success of Jurassic Park and the first flowering of the digital effects age and the opening of the DreamWorks era. The director talks about many aspects of his career: his non-blockbuster choices (The Color Purple, Always, Empire of the Sun) and lack of Oscar nominations for some of his work. He talks about his desire to make Rain Man, which took director Barry Levinson to the Oscars in 1989, and which Spielberg directed before commitment to Indiana Jones interceded.

This is a candid half hour with a man who was already one of the biggest directors in the world, but who also has many successes in front of him. It’s a great conversation with which to cap off your afternoon. Read More »

If this summer’s blockbuster film The Avengers taught us anything, is that there’s power in numbers. Thor or Iron Man are good on their own but, when they’re part of a team, they’re great. That team-up mentality is the focus of the latest art show at the Bottleneck Gallery in Brooklyn, NY. It’s called The Gang’s All Here and features art based on films, TV and more where a group of people team up for a cause. Which is actually quite a common story device, once you start thinking about it.

The show opens this Friday, November 16 and features some of the best gallery art we’ve seen in a while. For real. Just one example is a piece we’re happy to debut, Laurent Durieux‘s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, a stunning tribute to L. Frank Baum‘s work. But then there’s also stuff centering on Attack the Block, The Lost Boys, Hook, Watchmen, Game of Thrones, Alien, Seven Samurai, Monty Python, Super Troopers, Harry Potter, Star Wars and so much more, all of which focus on a group of people teaming up.

After the jump, check out a huge preview gallery of images and the exclusive reveal of Dureaux’s piece. Read More »

When MacGruber, the big-screen expansion of a few small MacGyver-parodying skits from SNL, was released in 2010, the film was considered a bomb. In short order, however, the film developed a passionate following, and the cult of MacGruber continues to grow from month to month.

Still, given how long it took to get the stars to align for a sequel to Anchorman — a much more popular film — it seems unlikely that we’ll ever see another MacGruber, no matter what director Jorma Taccone and star Will Forte might like, And yet they’re talking about it anyway. Taccone says the pair are planning a sequel, and tells ScreenCrush “It would be me, Will and John [Solomon] writing it again. Every time I hang out with Will, we talk about all our cool ideas for the sequel. We have the idea for it and we have a title, but I won’t tell you what it is.” As far as plot goes, Taccone would only reveal that there’s an inspiration from Die Hard, in that the film would take place at Christmas.

After the break Dante Basco, who played the Lost Boy Rufio in Steven Spielberg‘s Hook, says he’s part of the team developing a prequel explaining Rufio’s story. Read More »

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