Scream 4

Scream 5 has not seemed terribly likely to happen. Neither Wes Craven nor Neve Campbell seem to have much faith in the idea of the film, and the mere fact that it’s barely made any progress in the past two and a half years is a discouraging sign. But Harvey Weinstein, eternal optimist that he is, has not given up hope. He still wants to make Scream 5, so he can close out the series once and for all.

Regardless of whether the fifth film gets made, though, the franchise is set to live on on the small screen. It’s just that the new show won’t have much to do with the original movies. For one thing, it’ll introduce a new supernatural element. Hit the jump for Weinstein’s latest comments on Scream.

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Harvey Weinstein is a guy whose nature leads to intensely polarized opinions. He’s a mogul in the old style, who exerts his will with force, and grandstands, and makes good movies and irritating decisions in equal measure. Having been part of some of the biggest films of the last couple decades, Harvey also has endless stories to tell, and when he opens up there’s great stuff to learn.

Take Gangs of New York, the Martin Scorsese film that Weinstein produced in 2002. The massive project shot in Rome, and quickly became legendary in some circles as an example of Harvey’s heavy-handed demands for a shorter cut than the filmmaker wanted to deliver. Weinstein recently talked about that aspect of the film, but he also explained the origin of the CG elephant that roams through the elaborate riot sequence that acts as the climax of the film. Read More »


Bong Joon-ho‘s Snowpiercer opened in the director’s native South Korea last week, and will continue to roll out around the world for the next couple of months. It has broken box-office records at home and is very well-reviewed across the board. But despite having a distributor in The Weinstein Co., the film has yet to announce a U.S. opening date. Now we know what the holdup is.

The notoriously scissor-happy Harvey Weinstein reportedly has plans to chop up Snowpiercer, reducing its running time by about 20 minutes. And it’s not because the film’s bloated or unwieldy. It’s because in his opinion, according to one report, Midwesterners are too stupid to understand the movie as-is. Hit the jump for more about the edits.

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Artemis Fowl

Eoin Colfer‘s Artemis Fowl was a pretty big deal when it first hit shelves in 2001, enough so that Miramax quickly snapped up the film rights that same year. But nothing came of that deal, and even as contemporaries like Harry Potter, The Golden Compass, and Eragon have made their way to multiplexes, Artemis Fowl has been left behind.

Given the industry’s current obsession with all things YA, though, it was only a matter of time before someone got it into their heads to give Artemis Fowl another shot. That someone, it turns out, is Harvey Weinstein and Disney. They’ve just set Michael Goldenberg (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix) to pen the script, with Robert De Niro and Jane Rosenthal producing. Hit the jump for all the details.

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Over the holidays, it’s easy to lose track of what’s going on on Twitter. Many of us are too busy sitting around with our families, eating big meals or maybe going to the movies. If you fall into that category, you probably missed Kevin Smith‘s tell-all tweet marathon revealing an interesting story of how Ben Affleck asked him to direct a non-Miramax movie, why Fletch Won never happened, and more. But don’t worry. We’ve got it all embedded for you after the jump. Read More »

At 165 minutes, Quentin Tarantino‘s Django Unchained is hardly what you’d call brief. But it’s still shorter than the version we could’ve gotten, in some alternate universe.

During a press day in New York City, Tarantino revealed that Harvey Weinstein had once suggested splitting Django Unchained into two films, a la Kill Bill. And while Tarantino ultimately decided against it, he hasn’t entirely given up hope on getting some of that extra footage out there, possibly in the form of an extended cut. Read his comments after the jump.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

In the late Nineties, Chris Tucker was one of the biggest movie stars in the world. He was making over $20 million to star in Brett Ratner’s Rush Hour films but then he faded away. This was a guy who proved he was a comedy genius in the film Friday, could be awkward and great in a sci-fi film like The Fifth Element, but he more or less dropped off the face of the Earth after 1998’s Rush Hour, only returning for its two sequels. What happened? It seems he got a bit full of himself.

Harvey Weinstein appeared on Sirius XM’s The Opie and Anthony Show Wednesday morning and said that he and Quentin Tarantino approached Tucker to make and release a movie showcasing the actor’s stand-up comedy. It didn’t happen because of Tucker’s greed. Read the details below. Read More »

The battle between The Weinstein Co. and the MPAA over the rating for Lee Hirsch‘s Bully could finally be winding to a close, as sources claim that The Weinstein Co. is preparing a PG-13 cut of the anti-bullying doc after all. The unrated, unedited version of the film opened in five New York and Los Angeles-area theaters this past weekend to solid box office numbers, and is expected to roll out to 23 more markets on April 13 with the new cut. More details after the jump.

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OK, this is getting absurd. First, let’s recap. Lee Hirsch made a documentary called Bully that takes on the issue of bullying in schools, spurred in part by the suicides of several kids who were victims of bullying. The Weinstein Company is distributing the film, but found the picture tagged with an R rating by the MPAA, thanks to scenes in which kids talk like kids. (Read: there’s some dirty words in there.)

Last week TWC appealed the rating and lost by one vote. At that point Harvey Weinstein threatened to break from the MPAA entirely. Harvey, Hirsch and others have continued to campaign for the film, which they want to be able to show in schools. A young woman named Katy Butler — herself a victim of bullying — also launched her own petition on to ask the MPAA to give the film a PG-13 rating.

Now, as Harvey talks about releasing the film unrated, the National Association of Theatre Owners (NATO) is threatening to have association members treat the movie as if it is rated NC-17. Rarely is the argument over the release of a film so ironically captured by the film’s title as it is here. Read More »