‘The Ring 3′ Delayed Until 2016

The Ring 3

Pumped for The Ring 3? Sorry to break the news, but the sequel/reboot/prequel has been pushed to 2016. The film, titled Rings, is currently without a release date. F. Javier Gutiérrez‘s film has been flying far under the radar for a while now, so nobody should be shocked by this news. Learn why the film was removed from Paramount’s fall schedule after the jump.

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Dane DeHaan a cure for wellness

The name Gore Verbinski has complicated connotations. For a while, it inspired excitement in film fans. Now, that excitement cooled considerably, thanks in part to the director’s multiple years making bad, big-budget Disney movies. He’s trying to reclaim his name, though, and just took a significant step towards doing so.

Verbinski has committed to making a supernatural horror film called A Cure For Wellness, which follows a man who travels into the Swiss Alps to find his boss, only to be trapped in a mental institution. Dane DeHaan will play that main character and actress Mia Goth is in talks as well. The film will be written by Justin Haythe, who did The Lone Ranger with Verbinski but also wrote Sam Mendes’ underrated Revolutionary Road. Read more about A Cure for Wellness below. Read More »

Gore Verbinski

Gore Verbinski may be best known for big, bombastic blockbusters, but every once in a while he surprises us with something smaller. Rango is a great example. His hit remake The Ring is another. And though the director hasn’t stepped behind the camera since the disaster of The Lone Ranger, the idea for his next movie comprises a bit of both impulses. It’s an original idea with blockbuster potential.

Verbinski is now attached to an untitled film that’s being called “the Driverless Car Race pic.” Written by Steve Conrad (The Secret Life of Walter Mitty), it’s a cross-country race movie about cars that drive themselves, with a focus on how the passengers inside deal with that technology and loss of control. Sony Pictures will finance and distribute. Read more about the plot below. Read More »

Pyongyang movie canceled

One ripple from the decisions being made about Sony’s film The Interview is already being felt at another company. New Regency had been setting up a darkly comic film called Pyongyang to shoot in early 2015. The film, to be directed by Gore Verbinski with Steve Carell starring, was written to take place in the North Korean capital city after which the movie is named. Now, however, the picture has been scrapped. Read More »

Steve Carell paranoid thriller

Gore Verbinski is a good director who might just need the proper project to spark him back to life after The Lone Ranger. Steve Carell is an actor transitioning from one career phase to another, thanks to Foxcatcher (above). The idea of the two of them working together on a thriller is pretty intriguing, and that’s just what’s happening on an as-yet untitled new film that New Regency is putting together right now.

What details we have on that are below, but there’s more: Verbinski and New Regency are actually putting together a package of three films the director might do in fairly quick succession.

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New Regency, which co-produced Noah, recently signed a multi-year deal with Darren Aronofsky and his Protozoa Pictures. Now the company that just backed 12 Years a Slave and has Gone Girl and Birdman coming up has signed another three-year deal with a director and his production company. Gore Verbinski and his company Blind Wink are now aligned with New Regency, and Verbinski will produce and direct films for the company.

What’s first? Perhaps Pyongyang, a journey into North Korea based on the graphic novel by Guy Delisle. Read More »

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The Lone Ranger

There’s no question at this point that The Lone Ranger was a big fat flop, but why it failed so badly remains up for debate. Were audiences turned off by the cultural insensitivity? Does Johnny Depp need to put down the white makeup? Was the movie just not very good?

According to director Gore Verbinski, producer Jerry Bruckheimer, and stars Depp and Armie Hammer, the answer is none of the above. Instead, the team pegs the film’s poor box office performance on film critics, whom they believe were “gunning for” the movie due to its production troubles. Cue every single movie reviewer I know: If only we had that kind of power. Hit the jump to watch them complain.

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The Lone Ranger

Why is a film in which a magic horse eats scorpions off Armie Hammer’s face so insufferably fractured and dull? Now that I’ve got your attention, consider the unfortunate fate of a film, one eager to subvert Western tradition, which becomes deeply lost in the wilderness between the arthouse and multiplex.

The Lone Ranger, masterminded by the Pirates of the Caribbean team of Gore Verbinski (director) and Jerry Bruckheimer (producer), throws out one weird idea after another — fanged rabbits factor in — almost as distractions for the fact that it wants to batter the very myth of the American west. In all cases, it does so without any significant unifying principle to weave the ideas into a movie of any compelling merit. More interesting to talk about than it is to watch in the moment, The Lone Ranger is still a dud in the end.

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Lone Ranger Gore Verbinski

When George Lucas and Steven Spielberg said Hollywood would implode because of a reliance on massive blockbusters, they were probably thinking of films like those made by Gore Verbinski. The director has done small films — even winning an Oscar for the animated Rango — but he’s best known for the three Pirates of the Caribbean movies and now The Lone Ranger, which opens July 3. His latest film was a massive undertaking that cost hundreds of millions of dollars to make and even more to market.

When we sat down to talk to Verbinski, it seemed like the time to ask him about Lucas and Spielberg’s comments. He thinks there is a problem with Hollywood’s overspending, saying “we are on a crazy road to extinction.” Below, you can read more comments along with talk of genre conventions, the William Tell Overture, Hans Zimmer, and the struggle to get The Lone Ranger in front of cameras. Read More »