A set of ’70s sitcoms produced or developed by Norman Lear managed to change the tone of American television. All in the Family, Sanford and Son, One Day at a Time, The Jeffersons, Good Times, and Maude all addressed social and political issues to varying degrees through the basic structure of the sitcom.

Originally developed as a way to use the sitcom to show the lives of a hard-working, poor black family in a Chicago housing project, Good Times turned into a more broad, typical comedy thanks to the unexpected success of actor Jimmie Walker, whose popular catchprase “Dy-no-MITE!” gave the show’s writers an easy road to audience approval.

Now Good Times is being revived as a movie. Producer Scott Rudin (No Country For Old Men) and screenwriter Phil Johnston (Wreck-It Ralph, Cedar Rapids) are working with Sony to bring the show to the big screen. Read More »

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POTD: Kagan McLeod’s The Ghosts of Sitcoms Past

Kagan McLeod created this illustration featuring the mant actors and actresses from the past years of multi-camera sitcom history. How many of the 50 characters do you reccognize? Answer key on the National Post.

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