The Boys are in the orphanage. Columbia has been developing an adaptation of the Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson comic series for the past few years, but things have changed. The project has been put into turnaround, so another studio has a chance to step in and pick it up. This doesn’t have to be a death knell for the film — in fact, going into turnaround can sometimes be the best way for a project to get new life, as a company that is  a lot more invested in the material might step up to move it forward. Read More »

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Want to see a photo of animated Catwoman from Batman: Year One? How about a trailer for Mark Millar‘s Wolverine story Old Man Logan? Curious what things looked like behind the scenes on Captain America: The First Avenger? Would you like to own Stan Lee‘s head or comic book jewelry? Read about all of this and more in today’s Superhero Bits. Read More »

Despite the poor box office and critic reception on his latest film, I Am Number Four, director D.J. Caruso (Disturbia, Eagle Eye) recently tweeted the following:

My deal just closed on Preacher. Going back to the dark side and pretty fucking pumped!

Whoa! Someone is actually going to make a film version of Preacher. This fits in with the rumor Peter ran last week, saying that Caruso was in talks to direct the big screen adaptation of the famous, dark, Garth Ennis-written, Steve Dillon-drawn Vertigo comic book series. It appears he’s now locked the role down. Read more after the jump. Read More »

mckay-the-boys

As more and more graphic novels and comic books are adapted to the screen, studios are broadening the search for possible directors. It’s not just proven talents in action, horror and fantasy, but established vets of just about any stripe.

Earlier this year we heard that Samuel Bayer (A Nightmare on Elm Street) wanted to direct an adaptation of the Garth Ennis series The Boys, but it wasn’t a huge surprise to hear that the studio, Sony, wants someone a little different: Adam McKay, director of Anchorman and Step Brothers. Now Sony is reportedly close to getting him. Read More »

mckay-bayer-boys

Brad Fuller isn’t the only member of the A Nightmare on Elm Street team talking about future projects. Director Samuel Bayer has been linked (or hopes to be linked) to an adaptation of the Garth Ennis comic series The Boys. But now he’s saying that he might not have the job, as the current favorite to direct is Anchorman and Step Brothers helmer Adam McKay. Holy directorial shift! Read More »

erskine_dare

It looks like Sam Worthington is going to have another block to bust and another tentpole to erect because he’s the first talent to be tapped for a new, big-screen take on Dan Dare, Pilot of the Future. If you don’t know Dan Dare, then I expect you simply aren’t English. He’s as famous over here as Tintin is, at the very least, but is probably even less well known in the US than that Belgian boy reporter.

Created in 1950, Dare is a comic strip hero that proved more lastingly famous than Eagle, the comic he appeared in, just as Judge Dredd is a bigger brand than 2000AD or Batman than Detective Comics. He’s been compared to Buck Rogers, and I suppose that makes a lot of sense. Can you see Sam Worthington in the role of a proud Brit fighter pilot? To me, it seems like a particularly good fit for him… well, accent aside.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

the boys samuel bayer

Earlier today, we published a story about how Samuel Bayer is not interested in directing a sequel to A Nightmare on Elm Street, and hinted that he is developing an adaptation of a graphic novel.

There’s a comic– I’m sure my agent would kill me for this, because I’m sure I’m not supposed to talk about it or whatever, but I don’t really care, is that– no, my assistant is shaking her head. No. No? No? I was going to mention a project. Shut up? Okay. I’m doing what people tell me. Yeah, I’ll bury myself with this one. There’s some very, very cool stuff out there. I’m really into graphic novels and really into the superhero genre, and I really think there’s some interesting stuff going on, and I think that’s what I’m leaning towards.

Shock was able to uncover the identity of the comic book property: Garth EnnisThe Boys.

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HBO Kills Preacher Television Series

HBO has killed the planned television adaptation of Garth Ennis‘ popular Vertigo comic series Preacher. Mark Steven Johnson broke the news to ComicsContinuum, claiming that the project got to the budgeting stage before it was axed.

“The new head of HBO felt it was just too dark and too violent and too controversial. Which, of course, is kind of the point,” said Johnson. “It was a very faithful adaptation of the first few books, nearly word for word. They offered me the chance to redevelop it but I refused. I’ve learned my lesson on that front and I won’t do it again. So I’m afraid it’s dead at HBO.”

While this is sad news, I’m kind of glad that Johnson is off the project. After all, this is the same guy who made Ghost Rider and Daredeveil. I’m not sure I would like Johnson’s “faithful” adaptation. Johnson has heard that someone else “is in the process of getting the rights to turn it into a feature film.”

A film adaptation was once being developed at Kevin Smith’s production company – View Askew Productions, with James Marsden attached to play the lead. When the one-hour series was first announced in November 2006, Pretty in Pink director Howard Deutch named to helm the pilot episode. Robert Rodriguez was said to be one of the “many top-shelf directors interested in” helming an episode of the series. So I’m confident that the project will eventually get a green light somewhere.

But a television series seemed like such a great idea. My hope is that following the success of Dexter, that Showtime would make a play for a television adaptation. They certainly aren’t afraid of dark material. The only question is, do they have the budget.

The official plot synopsis from the graphic novel follows: “Here’s a book guaranteed to offend a bunch of people, not only because of its profuse profanity and graphic violence, but because it’s the epitome of iconoclasm. Like a brutal accident, you can’t watch but you can’t turn away. The story follows an ex-preacher man, Jesse, who has become disgusted with God’s abandoning of His responsibilities. So Jesse starts off into the wilds of Texas with his hitman girlfriend and new best friend (a vampire) to find God so that he can give Him a piece of his mind. Despite its superficial perversity, this book contains what may be the most moral character in mainstream comics. A cult hit in the making. Fans of Quentin Tarantino take note.”

The 75 issue comic book series was created by writer Garth Ennis and artist Steve Dillon, and published between 1995 to 2000.