Mortal Engines trailer

Ready for more YA dystopia? The Peter Jackson-produced Mortal Engines just dropped its eerie new teaser trailer online, featuring the city of London itself attached to giant Mad Max: Fury Road-style machinery. Christian Rivers helms this slice of post-apocalyptic extravaganza, with a script by Peter Jackson, Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens. Watch the Mortal Engines trailer is below.

Read More »

Lord of the Rings cast

Another day, another story accusing Harvey Weinstein of being a terrible human being, as director Peter Jackson recently claimed that Weinstein actively blocked Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino from joining the Lord of the Rings cast. This is just the latest in an ever-growing list of despicable behavior attributed to Weinstein, who was recently forced out of The Weinstein Company in light of multiple sexual assault allegations.

Read More »

Mortal Engines

Author Phillip Reeve’s four-part Predator Cities book series isn’t messing around when it comes to its title: in the future depicted in the novels, cities have become actual predators. Every city on Earth is now on wheels, constantly cruising around looking for smaller cities to consume and absorb.

The first book in that series, Mortal Engines, is getting a film adaptation from producer Peter Jackson and some of his The Lord of the Rings collaborators, and now Jackson has shared the first piece of Mortal Engines concept art with fans.
Read More »

Hugo Weaving Mortal Engines

The upcoming film adaptation of Mortal Engines is something of a Lord of the Rings reunion for the film’s writer and producer, Peter Jackson. One of the stars of Jackson’s beloved trilogy, Hugo Weaving, has joined the cast, which he wrote with Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Christian Rivers, who will direct the film.

Read More »

Mortal Engines movie

Several years agoPeter Jackson got involved with Mortal Engines, a post-apocalyptic steampunk adventure based on the books by Philip Reeve. The project went on the backburner while Jackson went off to direct the three Hobbit movies, but now that he’s back from Middle-earth he’s getting Mortal Engines going again. However, he won’t be the one directing. Instead, Mortal Engines is revving up with Jackson protégé Christian Rivers behind the wheel. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Desolation Of Smaug extended edition

The inevitable extended edition of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug hits blu-ray in November, and it will have 25 minutes added to the film. The second chapter in Peter Jackson‘s three-film adaptation of The Hobbit (with some other Tolkien material added) will feature quite a few extended scenes, and a host of behind the scenes documentaries, and commentaries from Jackson and writer Philippa Boyens. The bonus content runs to nine hours, which should keep fans busy until the December opening of the third and final film. Watch a clip from the Desolation of Smaug extended edition below. Read More »

Peter Jackson

What does one do after spending years in Middle-Earth? If you’re Peter Jackson, you remake King Kong, adapt The Lovely Bones, and then go back to Middle-Earth. (Even if the return trip was unplanned.)

The Fellowship of the Ring began early pre-productiin in 1997 and really kicked into gear in 1999, which means that by the time the third and final Hobbit movie is released in 2014, Peter Jackson will have spent a healthy chunk of the last seventeen years in or thinking about Middle-Earth. Time to move on? Yeah, more than likely. So what’s next? Small films, the director says, specifically focused on New Zealand stories. Read More »

The Hobbit

One of the few complains fans didn’t have with Peter Jackson‘s first Hobbit film, An Unexpected Journey, was “it’s too short.” Clocking in at about 2 hours and 50 minutes, it felt like the story of Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) joining a group of dwarves on a journey to the Lonely Mountain barely even began by the time the credits rolled. To be fair though, fans probably said the same thing after Jackson’s first Middle-Earth film, The Fellowship of the Ring. Yet when Jackson revealed the Extended Edition of that film on DVD, the added time enhanced the drama and character in many ways.

Jackson and his team are currently finishing the second film, The Desolation of Smaug, as well as the Extended Edition of An Unexpected Journey. Empire Magazine has some quotes about what exactly has been added to the first film. Will it enhance the film or just make it feel longer? Read More »

When The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey is good, it’s really good. Throughout Peter Jackson‘s first film in the Hobbit trilogy, his camera sweeps through an epic battle, and Howard Shore’s score crescendos through the speakers as thirteen dwarves, one wizard and a hobbit fight for their lives. That’s what most audiences are paying to see, and the film provides that on a grand scale, again and again.

“Again and again” is also the film’s biggest issue. On a consistent basis, it’s almost as if Jackson forgets he has two more films to release and is forced to pump the brakes. Tangents pop out of nowhere, dialogue scenes are stretched into infinity, and a familiar structure of capture followed by rousing escape, is consistently repeated. Much of the film feels like it’s purposely attempting to stall the dwarves’ quest from progressing.

What we’re left with is a huge, beautiful piece of entertainment, the lows of which are slightly outweighed by its adrenaline pumping highs. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey works, but feels bloated, derived from the fact that it’s based on a child’s book, only stuffed and stretched beyond the bounds of J.R.R. Tolkien‘s original narrative.  Still, its flaws and fun work hand in hand to provide a suitably rousing first act to the Hobbit trilogy. Read More »

The Lord of the Rings saved the West Memphis Three. It sounds like a crazy statement but one of the many things a viewer takes from Amy Berg‘s breathtakingly detailed and effective documentary West of Memphis is that co-producers Peter Jackson and Fran Walsh spent a lot of time, and even more money, to assist in the legal defense, new investigations and expert testimony which eventually lead to the 2011 release of the West Memphis Three, three men accused of murdering three boys in West Memphis, Arkansas in 1993. Jackson and Walsh got a lot of their money from The Lord of the Rings so, put two and two together, and the statement seems less crazy.

Jumping off where Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky took off with their Paradise Lost documentary trilogy, Berg’s film makes Purgatory, the latest of Berlinger and Sinofsky’s movies, feel elementary. It expands greatly on all of the revelations on that film, and provides new ones of its own that were filmed as recently as January 12, 2012. Whereas the first Paradise Lost was the definitive documentary on the beginning of this massive, controversial case, West of Memphis is the definitive documentary on its conclusion. Read More »